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Bill Clinton : New Gilded Age president / Patrick J. Maney.

By: Maney, Patrick J, 1946- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, 2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700621996; 0700621997.Subject(s): Presidents -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Bill Clinton.DDC classification: 973.929092 | B Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Bill Clinton and the New Gilded Age -- Making of a president, 1946-1992 -- Taking office, 1993 -- "On the edge," 1993 -- Defeat, 1993-1994 -- In search of three syllables: foreign policy, 1993-1996 -- Rebound, 1995-1996 -- Siege and survival, 1997-1999 -- The "new" economy, 1998-2000 -- Last chance: Clinton and the world, 1998-2000 -- Epilogue: the third term.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E886 .M27 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1c6v8b5 Available ocn939273740

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Bill Clinton and the New Gilded Age -- Making of a president, 1946-1992 -- Taking office, 1993 -- "On the edge," 1993 -- Defeat, 1993-1994 -- In search of three syllables: foreign policy, 1993-1996 -- Rebound, 1995-1996 -- Siege and survival, 1997-1999 -- The "new" economy, 1998-2000 -- Last chance: Clinton and the world, 1998-2000 -- Epilogue: the third term.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Admirers credit his "third way" domestic policies as the basis for a Goldilocks economy in the 1990s. For detractors, he was fundamentally "Slick Willy," whose word was never his bond. Maney (Boston College) surveys Bill Clinton's two terms as president from a detached perspective. In this telling, Clinton was quick witted and creative yet undisciplined, in both his personal appetites and his statecraft. Clinton suffered setbacks on the road to the White House and unhappy moments in office (not least once the Monica Lewinsky scandal broke), but he always rebounded. Maney's account of Clinton's decision-making as president is informative, albeit weakest taking stock of Clinton's mindset, his response to challenges posed by terrorists and Saddam Hussein, and the media environment in which he operated (Fox News gets nary a mention). Without question, the nation prospered during Clinton's presidency. Even as inequality increased, 30 million jobs were created, 7.7 million Americans were lifted out of poverty, and budgets balanced. Maney never says how much credit Clinton deserves for the good times, or blame for the 2008-09 economic meltdown, but his book is a useful starting point for understanding this protean US politician's White House years. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. --Michael J. Birkner, Gettysburg College

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