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The White House vice presidency : the path to significance, Mondale to Biden / Joel K. Goldstein.

By: Goldstein, Joel K. (Joel Kramer), 1953- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, 2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700622030; 0700622039.Subject(s): Vice-Presidents -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: White House vice presidency.DDC classification: 352.23/90973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- The vice presidency through history -- Laying the foundation -- The Mondale model: creating the vision -- Implementing the Mondale model -- Why it worked -- The White House vice presidency: Bush to Gore -- The triumph of the vice presidency: Cheney to Biden -- Determinants of vice-presidential role: Bush to Biden and beyond -- The vice-presidential selection process -- Criteria for selection -- Vice-presidential campaigns -- The vice president as successor -- The political future of vice presidents -- The problems with the vice presidency -- Conclusion.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E176.49 .G65 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1b4cx16 Available ocn939273741

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- The vice presidency through history -- Laying the foundation -- The Mondale model: creating the vision -- Implementing the Mondale model -- Why it worked -- The White House vice presidency: Bush to Gore -- The triumph of the vice presidency: Cheney to Biden -- Determinants of vice-presidential role: Bush to Biden and beyond -- The vice-presidential selection process -- Criteria for selection -- Vice-presidential campaigns -- The vice president as successor -- The political future of vice presidents -- The problems with the vice presidency -- Conclusion.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

From America's earliest years, the vice presidency has been seen as primarily weak and unimportant. John Adams, the office's first occupant, noted: "I am nothing, but I may be everything." From 1789 until 1977, Adams' comment was spot on. In the latter part of the 1970s, however, the office changed dramatically. Beginning with Walter Mondale, Jimmy Carter's vice president, and the five men who followed him, the office of vice president has become what Goldstein has labeled the "White House Vice Presidency." He examines the metamorphosis of the vice presidency from a subject of ridicule to becoming one of the president's closest advisers. This analysis shows a constitutional office that has evolved into a modern day position of considerable power. In the process, the person serving as vice president has become more experienced and prepared to take over should something happen to the nation's chief executive. That the changes made in the vice presidency by Mondale and Carter have lasted through five more vice presidents is a tribute to the creation of the "new" vice presidency as well as the importance and flexibility of the changes made. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers through faculty. --William K. Hall, Bradley University

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