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Lincoln and the politics of slavery : the other Thirteenth Amendment and the struggle to save the union / Daniel W. Crofts.

By: Crofts, Daniel W [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Civil War America (Series): Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2016]Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469627335; 1469627337.Subject(s): Slavery -- Law and legislation -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Lincoln and the politics of slaveryDDC classification: 973.7092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Prologue : the bread pill -- The antebellum context. The abolition movement and the problem of the Constitution ; Antislavery politics and the problem of the constitution ; The Republican Party, Abraham Lincoln, and the problem of the Constitution -- Origins of the other Thirteenth Amendment. Mutual misconceptions ; The Seward amendment ; The Corwin amendment -- Debating the other Thirteenth Amendment. Reaching across the abyss ; The unfazed and the alarmed ; The amendment assessed -- The abortive launch. Congress acts ; The president speaks ; The ratification fizzle -- Epilogue 1. James M. Ashley and the Thirteenth Amendment -- Epilogue 2. John A. Bingham and the Fourteenth Amendment.
Summary: In this landmark book, Daniel Crofts examines a little-known episode in the most celebrated aspect of Abraham Lincoln's life: his role as the "Great Emancipator." Lincoln always hated slavery, but he also believed it to be legal where it already existed, and he never imagined fighting a war to end it. In 1861, as part of a last-ditch effort to preserve the Union and prevent war, the new president even offered to accept a constitutional amendment that barred Congress from interfering with slavery in the slave states. Lincoln made this key overture in his first inaugural address. Crofts unearths the hidden history and political maneuvering behind the stillborn attempt to enact this amendment, the polar opposite of the actual Thirteenth Amendment of 1865 that ended slavery. This compelling book sheds light on an overlooked element of Lincoln's statecraft and presents a relentlessly honest portrayal of America's most admired president. Crofts rejects the view advanced by some Lincoln scholars that the wartime momentum toward emancipation originated well before the first shots were fired. Lincoln did indeed become the "Great Emancipator," but he had no such intention when he first took office. Only amid the crucible of combat did the war to save the Union become a war for freedom.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E457.2 .C935 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469627328_crofts Available ocn939598134

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Prologue : the bread pill -- The antebellum context. The abolition movement and the problem of the Constitution ; Antislavery politics and the problem of the constitution ; The Republican Party, Abraham Lincoln, and the problem of the Constitution -- Origins of the other Thirteenth Amendment. Mutual misconceptions ; The Seward amendment ; The Corwin amendment -- Debating the other Thirteenth Amendment. Reaching across the abyss ; The unfazed and the alarmed ; The amendment assessed -- The abortive launch. Congress acts ; The president speaks ; The ratification fizzle -- Epilogue 1. James M. Ashley and the Thirteenth Amendment -- Epilogue 2. John A. Bingham and the Fourteenth Amendment.

Print version record.

In this landmark book, Daniel Crofts examines a little-known episode in the most celebrated aspect of Abraham Lincoln's life: his role as the "Great Emancipator." Lincoln always hated slavery, but he also believed it to be legal where it already existed, and he never imagined fighting a war to end it. In 1861, as part of a last-ditch effort to preserve the Union and prevent war, the new president even offered to accept a constitutional amendment that barred Congress from interfering with slavery in the slave states. Lincoln made this key overture in his first inaugural address. Crofts unearths the hidden history and political maneuvering behind the stillborn attempt to enact this amendment, the polar opposite of the actual Thirteenth Amendment of 1865 that ended slavery. This compelling book sheds light on an overlooked element of Lincoln's statecraft and presents a relentlessly honest portrayal of America's most admired president. Crofts rejects the view advanced by some Lincoln scholars that the wartime momentum toward emancipation originated well before the first shots were fired. Lincoln did indeed become the "Great Emancipator," but he had no such intention when he first took office. Only amid the crucible of combat did the war to save the Union become a war for freedom.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

With this intelligent and absorbing book, Crofts (Reluctant Confederates) resurrects the story of the "first" and long-forgotten 13th Amendment, proposed by moderate Republicans and Democrats during the secession winter and narrowly passed by Congress and "endorsed" by Abraham Lincoln in his 1861 inaugural address in an effort to stem the secession madness they feared would drive the Upper South to secede and thereby send the Union into ruin and war. The amendment simply stated that under the Constitution the federal government could not, and so would not, interfere with slavery in the states where it already existed as law. Croft deftly shows the maneuvering both in and out of Congress that led the law to be passed, and the reasons for its failure. The Civil War ended the ratification process for this first 13th Amendment and provided the rationale for the 13th Amendment that in fact ended slavery in law; with that Lincoln's and other Republicans' 1861 effort to forestall war was lost to history. That loss of memory, Crofts insists, distorts the true history of Lincoln's and most Republicans' interest in 1861-to save the Union, not to move directly against slavery. VERDICT This account challenges the dominant emancipationist narrative and forces a new look at the dynamics and directions of politics and public interest during the secession crisis.-Randall M. Miller, St. -Joseph's Univ., Philadelphia © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

To most Americans, the 13th Amendment validated Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation by ending slavery in the US. But Crofts (College of New Jersey) tells the story of another piece of legislation that might have become the 13th Amendment. Between Lincoln's election in November 1860 and inauguration in March 1861, Congress crafted a constitutional amendment to guarantee the right to own slaves in regions where it currently existed, hoping to achieve a compromise and prevent civil war. Moderates accepted the necessity of the amendment to prevent violence, and radicals perceived the compromise as either an insufficient measure or a surrender to the "slaveocracy." Ohio Congressman Thomas Corwin, the champion of the measure, convinced the newly elected Lincoln to endorse the amendment, a far different action than that taken by the "Great Emancipator" just two years later, and Lincoln insinuated his support for the amendment in his first inauguration speech. Only three states ratified the measure before the outbreak of the Civil War rendered the effort moot. Crofts sorts through the dense political debate to present a highly readable account of a seldom-remembered feature of early Civil War history. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. --Steven J. Ramold, Eastern Michigan University

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