Robert Parris Moses : a life in civil rights and leadership at the grassroots / Laura Visser-Maessen.

By: Visser-Maessen, Laura [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469628004; 1469628007Subject(s): African American civil rights workers -- Mississippi -- Biography | Civil rights workers -- Mississippi -- Biography | African Americans -- Mississippi -- Biography | African Americans -- Civil rights -- MississippiAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Robert Parris MosesDDC classification: 323.092 LOC classification: E185.97.M89 | V57 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The making of a mind -- A movement education -- You killed my husband -- The Bob Moses mystique -- A new dimension -- Damned if you, damned if you don't -- Freedom is a constant struggle -- A moment lost -- Not a happy time.
Summary: "This new biography casts Moses in a new light, revealing him as a far more strategic, calculating, and hands-on organizer than in previous portrayals of him as an idealist and saintly figure."--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E185.97.M89 V57 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469627991_visser-maessen Available ocn941138243

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The making of a mind -- A movement education -- You killed my husband -- The Bob Moses mystique -- A new dimension -- Damned if you, damned if you don't -- Freedom is a constant struggle -- A moment lost -- Not a happy time.

"This new biography casts Moses in a new light, revealing him as a far more strategic, calculating, and hands-on organizer than in previous portrayals of him as an idealist and saintly figure."--Provided by publisher.

Title from PDF file title page (viewed November 17, 2016).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this debut work, Visser-Maessen (American studies, Utrecht Univ., Netherlands) brings together an intriguing character study of one of the most profoundly impactful local organizers of the civil rights era. Through the author's new scholarship, we see Robert Parris Moses (b. 1935) develop as an activist and become a necessary bridge among grassroots organizations and disenfranchised Southern blacks experiencing hardship from Jim Crow laws designed to prevent all but the most affluent and educated from voting. Moses held a unique stature as an organizer, if not always outright leadership roles in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). After discovering his calling in local campaigns in Mississippi, Moses was influential in encouraging deprived Southern residents to register to vote. While such an effort had also been advanced by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), it was Moses who was able to seek regional collaborators and advance community voices in his pursuit of voting rights. -VERDICT This compelling biography will be sought after by scholars of civil rights history and local organizing.-Jim Hahn, Univ. Lib., Univ. of Illinois, Urbana © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Bob Moses was one of the key figures in civil rights activism of the 1960s, an important local-level strategist in Mississippi. Visser-Maessen (American studies, Utrecht Univ., Netherlands) has written a fascinating blend of intellectual and political biography that explores how Moses arrived at the principles and priorities for leadership that shaped his effort as a civil rights activist and organizer, and how he expressed that leadership and dealt with inevitable challenges. The introduction and first chapter set a traditional biographical stage of personal development, but the work chiefly addresses Moses's years in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), 1960-64, and his contributions to the ideas and activities that fueled orderly rebellion among black Americans in the South against social place. Though Moses is still alive and well, an epilogue ties his later work with the Algebra Project to the values learned in his earlier years. The work exemplifies the new strain of historical inquiry that transcends simple narrative, examining the ideas and lived values of civil rights and social justice and not merely the personalities or politics of the time. Probably above the range of undergraduates and beyond casual readers, but positively indispensable for graduate programs. Summing Up: Essential. Graduate students and up. --Richard L Saunders, Southern Utah University

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