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Theodore E. White and the development of zooarchaeology in North America / R. Lee Lyman.

By: Lyman, R. Lee [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Critical studies in the history of anthropology.Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803290549; 0803290543.Subject(s): Animal remains (Archaeology) -- North America | Paleontologists -- Biography | Zoologists -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Theodore E. White and the development of zooarchaeology in North AmericaDDC classification: 560.92 | B Other classification: SOC003000 | SCI070000 | BIO006000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
1. Why Theodore E. White? -- 2. White's academic training and work history -- 3. White's contributions to paleontology -- 4. The emergence of North American zooarchaeology -- 5. Zooarchaeologists' knowledge and opinions of White -- 6. White's programmatic statements -- 7. White's substantive and methodological contributions -- 8. Theodore E. White and the emergence of anthropological zooarchaeology -- Appendix: "Observations on the butchering technique of some aboriginal peoples. No. 10, Bison bone from the Oldham Site," by Theodore E. White.
Summary: "Theodore E. White and the Development of Zooarchaeology in North America illuminates the researcher and his lasting contribution to a field that has largely ignored him in its history. The few brief histories of North American zooarchaeology suggest that Paul W. Parmalee, John E. Guilday, Elizabeth S. Wing, and Stanley J. Olsen laid the foundation of the field. Only occasionally is Theodore White (1905-77) included, yet his research is instrumental for understanding the development of zooarchaeology in North America. R. Lee Lyman works to fill these gaps in the historical record and revisits some of White's analytical innovations from a modern perspective. A comparison of publications shows that not only were White's zooarchaeological articles first in print in archaeological venues but that he was also, at least initially, more prolific than his contemporaries. While the other "founders" of the field were anthropologists, White was a paleontologist by training who studied long-extinct animals and their evolutionary histories. In working with remains of modern mammals, the typical paleontological research questions were off the table simply because the animals under study were too recent. And yet White demonstrated clearly that scholars could infer significant information about human behaviors and cultures. Lyman presents a biography of Theodore White as a scientist and a pioneer in the emerging field of modern anthropological zooarchaeology. "-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "An exploration into the origins of zooarchaeology in North America and Theodore E. White's role as a founding father"-- Provided by publisher.
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"Theodore E. White and the Development of Zooarchaeology in North America illuminates the researcher and his lasting contribution to a field that has largely ignored him in its history. The few brief histories of North American zooarchaeology suggest that Paul W. Parmalee, John E. Guilday, Elizabeth S. Wing, and Stanley J. Olsen laid the foundation of the field. Only occasionally is Theodore White (1905-77) included, yet his research is instrumental for understanding the development of zooarchaeology in North America. R. Lee Lyman works to fill these gaps in the historical record and revisits some of White's analytical innovations from a modern perspective. A comparison of publications shows that not only were White's zooarchaeological articles first in print in archaeological venues but that he was also, at least initially, more prolific than his contemporaries. While the other "founders" of the field were anthropologists, White was a paleontologist by training who studied long-extinct animals and their evolutionary histories. In working with remains of modern mammals, the typical paleontological research questions were off the table simply because the animals under study were too recent. And yet White demonstrated clearly that scholars could infer significant information about human behaviors and cultures. Lyman presents a biography of Theodore White as a scientist and a pioneer in the emerging field of modern anthropological zooarchaeology. "-- Provided by publisher.

"An exploration into the origins of zooarchaeology in North America and Theodore E. White's role as a founding father"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

1. Why Theodore E. White? -- 2. White's academic training and work history -- 3. White's contributions to paleontology -- 4. The emergence of North American zooarchaeology -- 5. Zooarchaeologists' knowledge and opinions of White -- 6. White's programmatic statements -- 7. White's substantive and methodological contributions -- 8. Theodore E. White and the emergence of anthropological zooarchaeology -- Appendix: "Observations on the butchering technique of some aboriginal peoples. No. 10, Bison bone from the Oldham Site," by Theodore E. White.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

R. Lee Lyman is a professor of anthropology at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He is the author of Quantitative Paleozoology and coauthor of Measuring Time with Artifacts: A History of Methods in American Archaeology (Nebraska, 2006).

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