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Europe and empire : on the political forms of globalization / Massimo Cacciari ; edited by Alessandro Carrera ; translated by Massimo Verdicchio.

By: Cacciari, Massimo [author.].
Contributor(s): Carrera, Alessandro [editor.] | Verdicchio, Massimo, 1945- [translator.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Commonalities: Publisher: New York : Fordham University Press, [2016]Copyright date: ©2016Edition: First edition.Description: 1 online resource (214 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780823267200; 0823267202; 9780823267194; 0823267199.Subject(s): European federation | Globalization -- Europe | European cooperation | Religion and state -- EuropeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Europe and empire.DDC classification: 327.4 Other classification: POL010000 | POL003000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction : Massimo Cacciari's genealogy of Europe / Alessandro Carrera -- PART I. THINKING EUROPE -- Thinking Europe -- Europeanism -- Two German speeches : the "second thought", the language of Europe -- Europe or philosophy -- Europe or Christianity -- PART II. THE IDEA OF EMPIRE -- What is empire? -- The myth of the growing city -- Digressions on empire and the three Romes -- More on the idea of empire -- Empire and Katechon : a question of political theology (from Paul, 2 Thessalonians 2) -- ADDENDA. The Europe of María Zambrano -- We cannot call ourselves only Judeo-Christians : a conversation with Jacques Le Goff.
Summary: "Assesses the current situation of Europe ten years after the adoption of the single currency. Examines the genealogy of the idea of Europe from the Greek confrontation with the Asia to the conflict between the Roman Empire and Christianity. Discusses the role of secularization in the shaping of modern Europe"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "The European Union and the single currency have given Europe more stability than it has known in the past thousand years, yet Europe seems to be in perpetual crisis about its global role. The many European empires are now reduced to a multiplicity of ethnicities, traditions, and civilizations. Europe will never be One, but to survive as a union it will have to become a federation of 'islands' both distinct and connected. Though drawing on philosophers of Europe's past, Cacciari calls not to resist Europe's sunset but to embrace it. Europe will have to open up to the possibility that in few generations new exiles and an unpredictable cultural hybridism will again change all we know about the European legacy. Though scarcely alive in today's politics, the political unity of Europe is still a necessity, however impossible it seems to achieve"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D1060 .C223 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt18kr6d9 Available ocn941700235

Collection of essays in Italian published individually by the author over several decades, edited and published together in an English translation.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 187-196) and index.

Introduction : Massimo Cacciari's genealogy of Europe / Alessandro Carrera -- PART I. THINKING EUROPE -- Thinking Europe -- Europeanism -- Two German speeches : the "second thought", the language of Europe -- Europe or philosophy -- Europe or Christianity -- PART II. THE IDEA OF EMPIRE -- What is empire? -- The myth of the growing city -- Digressions on empire and the three Romes -- More on the idea of empire -- Empire and Katechon : a question of political theology (from Paul, 2 Thessalonians 2) -- ADDENDA. The Europe of María Zambrano -- We cannot call ourselves only Judeo-Christians : a conversation with Jacques Le Goff.

"Assesses the current situation of Europe ten years after the adoption of the single currency. Examines the genealogy of the idea of Europe from the Greek confrontation with the Asia to the conflict between the Roman Empire and Christianity. Discusses the role of secularization in the shaping of modern Europe"-- Provided by publisher.

"The European Union and the single currency have given Europe more stability than it has known in the past thousand years, yet Europe seems to be in perpetual crisis about its global role. The many European empires are now reduced to a multiplicity of ethnicities, traditions, and civilizations. Europe will never be One, but to survive as a union it will have to become a federation of 'islands' both distinct and connected. Though drawing on philosophers of Europe's past, Cacciari calls not to resist Europe's sunset but to embrace it. Europe will have to open up to the possibility that in few generations new exiles and an unpredictable cultural hybridism will again change all we know about the European legacy. Though scarcely alive in today's politics, the political unity of Europe is still a necessity, however impossible it seems to achieve"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This volume collects a number of essays written from 1994 to 2012 by the Italian philosopher and politician Massimo Cacciari. The essays document Cacciari's ongoing attempts to "think" Europe at the turn of the last century. Here, he stresses the need for differing ideas of empire to propel forward a new conception (and reality) of Europe. The collection contains an important unpublished essay on the key notion of the katechon, a Christian concept adopted by Carl Schmitt to capture the idea of a force that "withholds." An indispensable introduction by Alessandro Carrera (Univ. of Houston) notes the influence on Cacciari's thought of his being a citizen--and former Mayor--of Venice. For Cacciari, Carrera suggests, Europe can only move forward by envisioning itself as Venice writ large--not as a unified empire, but an archipelago of interconnected countries. Cacciari's work is essential for those interested in Continental political theory; if you read Schmitt and Giorgio Agamben, you must read Cacciari. Summing Up: Essential. Graduate students and faculty. --Richard J. Meagher, Randolph-Macon College

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