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Antiracism in Cuba : the unfinished revolution / Devyn Spence Benson.

By: Benson, Devyn Spence [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Envisioning Cuba: Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2016]Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469626741; 1469626748.Subject(s): Racism -- CubaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Antiracism in Cuba.DDC classification: 305.80097291 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: race and revolution in Cuba -- Not blacks, but citizens: racial rhetoric and the 1959 revolution -- The black citizen of the future: Afro-Cuban activists and the 1959 revolution -- From Miami to New York and beyond: race and exile in the 1960s -- Cuba calls!: exploiting African American and Cuban alliances for equal rights -- Poor, black, and a teacher: loyal black revolutionaries and the literacy campaign -- Epilogue: a revolution inside of the revolution: Afro-Cuban experiences after 1961.
Action note: EBL ddaSummary: "Analyzing the ideology and rhetoric around race in Cuba and south Florida during the early years of the Cuban revolution, Devyn Spence Benson argues that ideas, stereotypes, and discriminatory practices relating to racial difference persisted despite major efforts by the Cuban state to generate social equality. ... examines 1960s government programs and campaigns against discrimination, showing how such programs frequently negated their efforts by reproducing racist images and idioms in revolutionary propaganda, cartoons, and school materials"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F1789.A1 B46 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469626734_benson Available ocn942755201

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: race and revolution in Cuba -- Not blacks, but citizens: racial rhetoric and the 1959 revolution -- The black citizen of the future: Afro-Cuban activists and the 1959 revolution -- From Miami to New York and beyond: race and exile in the 1960s -- Cuba calls!: exploiting African American and Cuban alliances for equal rights -- Poor, black, and a teacher: loyal black revolutionaries and the literacy campaign -- Epilogue: a revolution inside of the revolution: Afro-Cuban experiences after 1961.

"Analyzing the ideology and rhetoric around race in Cuba and south Florida during the early years of the Cuban revolution, Devyn Spence Benson argues that ideas, stereotypes, and discriminatory practices relating to racial difference persisted despite major efforts by the Cuban state to generate social equality. ... examines 1960s government programs and campaigns against discrimination, showing how such programs frequently negated their efforts by reproducing racist images and idioms in revolutionary propaganda, cartoons, and school materials"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

EBL dda UPB

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Benson's thoughtful book challenges many ideas about race in Cuba and in general. From reference to the 1912 massacre of supporters of the black political party (Independent Party of Color) to the author's personal account of how a Cuban clerk changed her racial identity on a visa application, Benson provides a thorough and nuanced account of race relations in Cuba. She focuses on the Cuban understanding of a raceless society as the legacy of independence leaders, white Jose Martí and black Antonio Maceo. Castro's revolution, led mostly by whites, adopted a goal of ending racism in Cuba that defined racism as economic rather than cultural. Postrevolutionary Cuba saw blacks and mulattos as dependent on the revolution, and expected obedience and appreciation. Benson provides individual stories showing how some Afro Cubans accepted their place in the revolution, while others challenged revolutionary leaders and highlighted continued racism in Cuba. The book provides a perspective not otherwise found in studies of the Cuban Revolution, and stresses Afro-descendants' ownership of their place in Cuba's history. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --James A. Baer, Northern Virginia Community College

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