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Modern manhood and the Boy Scouts of America : citizenship, race, and the environment, 1910-1930 / Benjamin René Jordan.

By: Jordan, Benjamin René [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469627670; 1469627671.Subject(s): Masculinity -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Modern manhood and the Boy Scouts of AmericaDDC classification: 369.4301/9 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Ax-men and typewriter-men: the BSA's full-orbed manhood -- The BSA's triumph: balancing traditional and modern manhood and authority -- Scout character: men's skills for corporate-industrial work and urban society -- Practical citizenship -- Nature, conservation, and modern manhood -- Mainstreaming white immigrants and the industrial working class in the BSA -- Rural manhood and lone scouting on the margins of a modernizing society -- The right sort of colored boy and man: African American scouting -- Epilogue: Scout manhood and citizenship in the Great Depression.
Summary: "In this illuminating look at gender and scouting in the United States, Benjamin René Jordan examines how in its founding and early rise, the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) integrated traditional Victorian manhood with modern, corporate-industrial values and skills. While showing how the BSA Americanized the original British Scouting program, Jordan finds that the organization's community-based activities signaled a shift in men's social norms, away from rugged agricultural individualism or martial primitivism and toward productive employment in offices and factories, stressing scientific cooperation and a pragmatic approach to the responsibilities of citizenship"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HS3313 .J67 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469627663_jordan Available ocn944187060

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Ax-men and typewriter-men: the BSA's full-orbed manhood -- The BSA's triumph: balancing traditional and modern manhood and authority -- Scout character: men's skills for corporate-industrial work and urban society -- Practical citizenship -- Nature, conservation, and modern manhood -- Mainstreaming white immigrants and the industrial working class in the BSA -- Rural manhood and lone scouting on the margins of a modernizing society -- The right sort of colored boy and man: African American scouting -- Epilogue: Scout manhood and citizenship in the Great Depression.

"In this illuminating look at gender and scouting in the United States, Benjamin René Jordan examines how in its founding and early rise, the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) integrated traditional Victorian manhood with modern, corporate-industrial values and skills. While showing how the BSA Americanized the original British Scouting program, Jordan finds that the organization's community-based activities signaled a shift in men's social norms, away from rugged agricultural individualism or martial primitivism and toward productive employment in offices and factories, stressing scientific cooperation and a pragmatic approach to the responsibilities of citizenship"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

When one thinks of boy scouts, all sorts of images may cross one's mind, such as their wearing military-like uniforms, camping, hiking, earning merit badges, performing good deeds, and young men becoming outstanding citizens because of their membership in the scouts. Such perceptions are correct and part of the story about scouting, but the author offers an alternative viewpoint. Jordan (history, Christian Brothers Univ.) mentions that US scouting owes much to the British as well as to minor competitive US efforts that evolved into the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) in the early 20th century. He mentions the value of what scouting meant to young people, 1910-30--an era of overt racism that applied to African Americans (who until the late 1920s were barred from membership), while the BSA sought "light-skinned" boys from the cities (rural boys were considered inferior) for membership. Feminization of the culture concerned BSA leaders, too. This history of scouting thus becomes a social and cultural history of the era. A fine companion read is Julia Grant's The Boy Problem: Educating Boys in Urban America, 1870-1970 (CH, Nov'14, 52-1540). Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Paul D. Travis, Texas Woman's University

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