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Indians illustrated : the image of Native Americans in the pictorial press / John M. Coward.

By: Coward, John M [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.History of communication: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252098529; 0252098528.Subject(s): Indians of North America -- Press coverage -- History | Indians of North America -- Public opinion -- History | Illustrated periodicals -- United States -- History | Journalism, Pictorial -- Social aspects -- United States -- History | Visual communication -- United States -- History | Stereotypes (Social psychology) -- United States -- History | Indians in popular culture -- United States -- History | Public opinion -- United States -- History | Popular culture -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Indians illustrated.DDC classification: 070.4/4997000497 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Illustrating Indians in the pictorial press -- Posing the Indian : Native American portraits in the illustrated press -- Illustrating Indian lives : difference and deficiency in Native American imagery -- The princess and the squaw : the construction of Native American women in the pictorial press -- Making images on the Indian frontier : the adventures of special artist Theodore Davis -- Illustrating the Indian Wars : fact, fantasy, and ideology -- Making sense of savagery : Native American cartoons in the Daily graphic -- Remington's Indian illustrations : race, realism, and pictorial journalism -- Visualizing race : Native American and African American imagery in Frank Leslie's illustrated newspaper -- Conclusion: Illustrating race, demonstrating difference.
Scope and content: "Indians Illustrated is a social and cultural history of Indian illustrations in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Harper's Weekly, and other illustrated journals during the last half of the nineteenth century, the heyday of the American pictorial press. The pictorial press era, spurred in the mid-1850s by the transportation revolution, innovations in printing technology, and an expanded literary and pictorial market, was marked by a proliferation of detailed, realistic woodblock engravings, pictures of newsworthy people and interesting events from across the nation and the world. The pictorial press frequently depicted Indians and Indian life in popular but narrowly conceived ways. In pictures, Indians were simplified and presented in familiar and easily understood categories, usually as variations on the 'good' Indian/'bad' Indian stereotypes long established in Euro-American culture. Indian men were depicted as 'tall and copper-colored, with braided hair, clothed in buckskin, and moccasins, and adorned in headdresses, beadwork and/or turquoise' while Indian women were depicted as either Indian princesses or squaws. John Coward argues that these pictures helped create and sustain a host of popular ideas and attitudes about Indians, especially ideas about the way Indians were supposed to look and act. By describing and analyzing the various themes and visual tropes across the years of the illustrated press, this book provides a deeper understanding of the racial codes and visual signs that white Americans used to represent Native Americans in an era of western expansion and Manifest Destiny"--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN4888.I52 C67 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt18j8xvg Available ocn944246492

"Indians Illustrated is a social and cultural history of Indian illustrations in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Harper's Weekly, and other illustrated journals during the last half of the nineteenth century, the heyday of the American pictorial press. The pictorial press era, spurred in the mid-1850s by the transportation revolution, innovations in printing technology, and an expanded literary and pictorial market, was marked by a proliferation of detailed, realistic woodblock engravings, pictures of newsworthy people and interesting events from across the nation and the world. The pictorial press frequently depicted Indians and Indian life in popular but narrowly conceived ways. In pictures, Indians were simplified and presented in familiar and easily understood categories, usually as variations on the 'good' Indian/'bad' Indian stereotypes long established in Euro-American culture. Indian men were depicted as 'tall and copper-colored, with braided hair, clothed in buckskin, and moccasins, and adorned in headdresses, beadwork and/or turquoise' while Indian women were depicted as either Indian princesses or squaws. John Coward argues that these pictures helped create and sustain a host of popular ideas and attitudes about Indians, especially ideas about the way Indians were supposed to look and act. By describing and analyzing the various themes and visual tropes across the years of the illustrated press, this book provides a deeper understanding of the racial codes and visual signs that white Americans used to represent Native Americans in an era of western expansion and Manifest Destiny"--Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Illustrating Indians in the pictorial press -- Posing the Indian : Native American portraits in the illustrated press -- Illustrating Indian lives : difference and deficiency in Native American imagery -- The princess and the squaw : the construction of Native American women in the pictorial press -- Making images on the Indian frontier : the adventures of special artist Theodore Davis -- Illustrating the Indian Wars : fact, fantasy, and ideology -- Making sense of savagery : Native American cartoons in the Daily graphic -- Remington's Indian illustrations : race, realism, and pictorial journalism -- Visualizing race : Native American and African American imagery in Frank Leslie's illustrated newspaper -- Conclusion: Illustrating race, demonstrating difference.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on August 09, 2016).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

It really is true that a picture is worth a thousand words. At the core of Indians Illustrated is the idea that images of Indians in the popular press during the 1800s largely influenced the way in which indigenous people were viewed by white society. It is these images, Coward argues, that both created and perpetuated stereotypes of Indians. While sensational and vivid, the images were created more for selling power than for historic accuracy. The fact that the general public and policy makers did not know the difference mattered little to publishers such as Harper's Bazaar. The book does a great job of demonstrating the powerful impact of these images through text and example after example of demonstrative illustrations. While the work seems to go in two different directions (a broad analysis with categories of stereotype, and an individual focus on two specific illustrators, Remington and Leslie), the point remains that illustrations of Indians, whether by individuals artists or through a number of artists sharing a common approach to a vision, were largely responsible for the way in which Native Americans were viewed and understood both then and today. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Jeffrey S. Ashley, Eastern Illinois University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John M. Coward is an associate professor of communication at the University of Tulsa. He is the author of The Newspaper Indian: Native American Identity in the Press, 1820 "90 .

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