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Imprints : the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the city of Chicago / John N. Low.

By: Low, John N [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: East Lansing, Michigan : Michigan State University Press, [2016]Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781609174750; 1609174755.Other title: Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the city of Chicago.Subject(s): Potawatomi Indians -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History | Potawatomi Indians -- History | Potawatomi Indians -- Cultural assimilation -- Illinois -- Chicago | Potawatomi Indians -- Land tenureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 970.004/97 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1. The Potawatomi as Chicago's Early Urban Indians; Chapter 2. Simon Pokagon's Claims of Equality and Appeals for Inclusion; Chapter 3. Claims Making to the Chicago Lakefront; Chapter 4. The Legacies of Turner, Cody, Streeter, and the Pokagon Potawatomi; Chapter 5. Leroy Wesaw and the Chicago Canoe Club; Chapter 6. Monuments, Memorials, and the Continued Presence of the Potawatomi in Chicago; Appendix 1. Transcription of Pottawattamie Book of Genesis: Legend of the Creation of Man
Appendix 2. Selected Essays, Articles, and Monographs Regarding Simon PokagonAppendix 3. List of Works by Simon Pokagon; Appendix 4. Timeline of the 1812 Battle of Fort Dearborn; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians has been a part of Chicago since its founding. In very public expressions of indigeneity, they have refused to hide in plain sight or assimilate. Instead, throughout the city's history, the Pokagon Potawatomi Indians have openly and aggressively expressed their refusal to be marginalized or forgotten-and in doing so, they have contributed to the fabric and history of the city. Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago examines the ways some Pokagon Potawatomi tribal members have maintained a distinct Native identity, their rejection of assimilation into the mainstream, and their desire for inclusion in the larger contemporary society without forfeiting their "Indianness." Mindful that contact is never a one-way street, Low also examines the ways in which experiences in Chicago have influenced the Pokagon Potawatomi. Imprints continues the recent scholarship on the urban Indian experience before as well as after World War II.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E99.P8 L694 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.14321/j.ctt18j8z1j Available ocn945095058

Online resource; title from PDF title page (EBSCO, viewed March 21, 2016)

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians has been a part of Chicago since its founding. In very public expressions of indigeneity, they have refused to hide in plain sight or assimilate. Instead, throughout the city's history, the Pokagon Potawatomi Indians have openly and aggressively expressed their refusal to be marginalized or forgotten-and in doing so, they have contributed to the fabric and history of the city. Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago examines the ways some Pokagon Potawatomi tribal members have maintained a distinct Native identity, their rejection of assimilation into the mainstream, and their desire for inclusion in the larger contemporary society without forfeiting their "Indianness." Mindful that contact is never a one-way street, Low also examines the ways in which experiences in Chicago have influenced the Pokagon Potawatomi. Imprints continues the recent scholarship on the urban Indian experience before as well as after World War II.

Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1. The Potawatomi as Chicago's Early Urban Indians; Chapter 2. Simon Pokagon's Claims of Equality and Appeals for Inclusion; Chapter 3. Claims Making to the Chicago Lakefront; Chapter 4. The Legacies of Turner, Cody, Streeter, and the Pokagon Potawatomi; Chapter 5. Leroy Wesaw and the Chicago Canoe Club; Chapter 6. Monuments, Memorials, and the Continued Presence of the Potawatomi in Chicago; Appendix 1. Transcription of Pottawattamie Book of Genesis: Legend of the Creation of Man

Appendix 2. Selected Essays, Articles, and Monographs Regarding Simon PokagonAppendix 3. List of Works by Simon Pokagon; Appendix 4. Timeline of the 1812 Battle of Fort Dearborn; Notes; Bibliography; Index

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This important contribution documents ways that the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi have maintained an ongoing and enduring presence in Chicago. Low (comparative studies, Ohio State Univ. at Newark), an enrolled citizen of the Pokagon Band, grounds his work in the different ways that people make meaning of space and place. He effectively uses multiple narratives to study the connections between the past and the present. As a result, Chicago emerges from this study as a place that was fundamentally shaped by continued Potawatomi interactions, even as Potawatomi physical residence was limited, denied, and ignored by non-Natives. Essay topics are varied: Simon Pokagon and his book Queen of the Woods (1899), which argued for equality and Indian inclusion; an early-20th-century land claim to downtown Chicago that illustrates the ways the Potawatomi mapped their world; the making of the Chicago frontier in an American national narrative (and the place of Indians within that narrative); the mid- to late-20th-century Chicago canoe club and its effect on tribal identity; and the heightened visibility and presence of the Potawatomi today. Overall, Low engages in a particularly rich and productive interdisciplinary discussion that adds substantially to the literature. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Kristina L. Ackley, The Evergreen State College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John N. Low received his PhD in American Culture at the University of Michigan and is an enrolled citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians. He is an assistant professor in comparative studies at Ohio State University-Newark where he also teaches in history and American Indian studies.

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