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Manhood on the line ; working-class masculinities in the American heartland / Stephen Meyer.

By: Meyer, Stephen, 1942-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Working class in American history: Publisher: Urbana, Chicago, and Springfield : University of Illinois Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252098253; 0252098250.Subject(s): Automobile industry workers -- United States -- History | Working class -- United States -- History | Sexual division of labor -- United States | Women employees -- United States | Discrimination in employment -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Manhood on the line ; working-class masculinities in the American heartland.DDC classification: 331.7/6292220973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface -- Introduction: forms and meanings of working-class manhood -- Lost manhood : mass production and auto worker masculinity -- Reclaiming manhood : shop culture, industrial unionism, and the derogation of women, 1920s and 1930s -- "Rats, finks, and stool pigeons" : the disreputable manhood of factory spies in the 1920s and 1930s -- Fighting to provide : the battle to organize the Ford River Rouge Plant, 1930-1945 -- Fashioning dense masculine space : industrial unionism and altered shop-floor relations, 1935-1960s -- The female "invasion" : women and the male workplace, 1940-1945 -- The challenge to white manhood: black men and women move to white male jobs, 1940-1945 -- Conclusion: the more things change, the more they stay the same -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- Index.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD8039.A82 M4659 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt18j8xqd Available ocn945771867

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Preface -- Introduction: forms and meanings of working-class manhood -- Lost manhood : mass production and auto worker masculinity -- Reclaiming manhood : shop culture, industrial unionism, and the derogation of women, 1920s and 1930s -- "Rats, finks, and stool pigeons" : the disreputable manhood of factory spies in the 1920s and 1930s -- Fighting to provide : the battle to organize the Ford River Rouge Plant, 1930-1945 -- Fashioning dense masculine space : industrial unionism and altered shop-floor relations, 1935-1960s -- The female "invasion" : women and the male workplace, 1940-1945 -- The challenge to white manhood: black men and women move to white male jobs, 1940-1945 -- Conclusion: the more things change, the more they stay the same -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- Index.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Nearly 40 years in the making, this "history from the bottom up" explores the relationship between the workplace culture of US automobile industrial employees and masculine identity. Through the use of archival research, oral history, and content analysis, Meyer (emer., history, Univ. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) thoroughly documents key factors and turning points contributing to the vacillation of "rough" and "respectable" workplace cultures over time. Such cultures, in turn, helped shape notions of masculinity among the skilled, semi-skilled, and unskilled employees in these settings. Essentially, the author presents a convincing argument that one cannot fully comprehend the history of workplace industrial relations without an understanding of shifts in masculinity and vice versa; the two are inextricably related. He devotes considerable attention to how the forces of automation, globalization, deindustrialization, and de-unionization and the swelling ranks of women and minorities in work settings further altered workplace relations and, hence, masculinity itself. The result is a well-reasoned, thoroughly researched history that makes an important contribution to masculinity and gender studies, the sociology of work, labor history, and industrial relations. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, faculty. --John R. Mitrano, Central Connecticut State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Stephen Meyer is an emeritus professor of history at the University of Wisconsin "Milwaukee. His books include The Five Dollar Day: Labor Management and Social Control in the Ford Motor Company, 1908 "1921 .

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