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Against citizenship : the violence of the normative / Amy L. Brandzel.

By: Brandzel, Amy L, 1970- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Dissident feminisms: Publisher: Urbana, Illinois : University of Illinois Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (pages cm).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252098239; 0252098234.Subject(s): Race relations -- Cases | Hate crimes -- United States -- Cases | Same-sex marriage -- Law and legislation -- United States -- Cases | Citizenship -- United States -- CasesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Against citizenship.DDC classification: 342.7308/3 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction : the violence of the normative -- The specters of citizenship : hate crimes and the fear of the repressed -- Intersectionalities lost and found : same-sex marriage law and the monstrosities of alliance -- Legal detours of U.S. empire : locating race and indigeneity in law, history, and Hawai'i -- Conclusion : in and out of time.
Summary: "Numerous activists and scholars have appealed for rights, inclusion, and justice in the name of "citizenship." Against Citizenship provocatively shows that there is nothing redeemable about citizenship, nothing worth salvaging or sustaining in the name of "community," practice, or belonging. According to Brandzel, citizenship is a violent dehumanizing mechanism that makes the comparative devaluing of human lives seem commonsensical, logical, and even necessary. Against Citizenship argues that whenever we work on behalf of citizenship, whenever we work toward including more types of peoples under its reign, we inevitably reify the violence of citizenship against nonnormative others. Brandzel's focus on three legal case studies--same-sex marriage law, hate crime legislation, and Native Hawaiian sovereignty and racialization--exposes how citizenship confounds and obscures the mutual processes of settler colonialism, racism, sexism, and heterosexism. In this way, Brandzel argues that citizenship requires anti-intersectionality, that is, strategies that deny the mutuality and contingency of race, class, gender, sexuality, and nation--and how, oftentimes, progressive left activists and scholars follow suit. Against Citizenship is an impassioned plea for a queer, decolonial, anti-racist coalitional stance against the systemized human de/valuing and anti-intersectionalities of citizenship."--Publisher's website.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF4700 .B73 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt18j8xbq Available ocn945874987

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Introduction : the violence of the normative -- The specters of citizenship : hate crimes and the fear of the repressed -- Intersectionalities lost and found : same-sex marriage law and the monstrosities of alliance -- Legal detours of U.S. empire : locating race and indigeneity in law, history, and Hawai'i -- Conclusion : in and out of time.

"Numerous activists and scholars have appealed for rights, inclusion, and justice in the name of "citizenship." Against Citizenship provocatively shows that there is nothing redeemable about citizenship, nothing worth salvaging or sustaining in the name of "community," practice, or belonging. According to Brandzel, citizenship is a violent dehumanizing mechanism that makes the comparative devaluing of human lives seem commonsensical, logical, and even necessary. Against Citizenship argues that whenever we work on behalf of citizenship, whenever we work toward including more types of peoples under its reign, we inevitably reify the violence of citizenship against nonnormative others. Brandzel's focus on three legal case studies--same-sex marriage law, hate crime legislation, and Native Hawaiian sovereignty and racialization--exposes how citizenship confounds and obscures the mutual processes of settler colonialism, racism, sexism, and heterosexism. In this way, Brandzel argues that citizenship requires anti-intersectionality, that is, strategies that deny the mutuality and contingency of race, class, gender, sexuality, and nation--and how, oftentimes, progressive left activists and scholars follow suit. Against Citizenship is an impassioned plea for a queer, decolonial, anti-racist coalitional stance against the systemized human de/valuing and anti-intersectionalities of citizenship."--Publisher's website.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Brandzel (Univ. of New Mexico) argues that the desire for recognition and inclusion as full citizens by those currently excluded is not the neutral aspiration that many imagine. Rather than being a private choice, this desire can increase the disenfranchisement of others who are not full citizens. Groups compete against each other for seemingly scarce resources and recognition, when what is needed is an intersectional analysis that rejects normativity altogether. Hate crime legislation, for example, further empowers a criminal justice system that regularly brutalizes those that such legislation is designed to protect. Moreover, it is anti-intersectional in revealing ways that categories of identity are pitted against one another. Marriage equality may be a gain for some individuals, but it slots more individuals into a heteronormative institution and strengthens the discipline of a state-defined status. Finally, the US Supreme Court's approach to native Hawaiians has been colorblind or an "apologetic liberalism" that apologizes for past wrongs without recognizing present-day infringements on sovereignty and status. Overall, Brandzel calls for a reclaiming and reframing of difference, a "queering" of normative faith in inclusive citizenship as the path to justice. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and faculty. --Emily R. Gill, Bradley University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Amy L. Brandzel is an assistant professor of American studies and women studies at the University of New Mexico.

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