Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Sharing the work : what my family and career taught me about breaking through (and holding the door open for others) / Myra Strober ; foreword by John Donahoe.

By: Strober, Myra H [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, MA : MIT Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780262332095; 0262332094.Subject(s): Women economists -- United States -- Biography | Women college teachers -- United States -- Biography | Women in the professions -- United States | Sex discrimination -- United States | Work and family -- United States | Feminism -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Sharing the work.DDC classification: 330.092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "Myra Strober became a feminist on the Bay Bridge, heading toward San Francisco. It is 1970. She has just been told by the chairman of Berkeley's economics department that she can never get tenure. Driving home afterward, wondering if she got something out of the freezer for her family's dinner, she realizes the truth: she is being denied a regular faculty position because she is a mother. Flooded with anger, she also finds her life's work: to study and fight sexism, in the workplace, in academia, and at home. Strober's generous memoir captures the spirit of a revolution lived fully, from her Brooklyn childhood (and her shock at age twelve when she's banished to the women's balcony atshul) to her groundbreaking Stanford seminar on women and work. Strober's interest in women and work began when she saw her mother's frustration at the limitations of her position as a secretary. Her consciousness of the unfairness of the usual distribution of household chores came when she unsuccessfully asked her husband for help with housework. Later, when a group of conservative white male professors sputtered at the idea of government-subsidized child care, Strober made the case for its economic benefits."--Provided by publisher.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HB119.S76 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1bgz9p3 Available ocn945976103

Includes index.

Description based on print version record.

"Myra Strober became a feminist on the Bay Bridge, heading toward San Francisco. It is 1970. She has just been told by the chairman of Berkeley's economics department that she can never get tenure. Driving home afterward, wondering if she got something out of the freezer for her family's dinner, she realizes the truth: she is being denied a regular faculty position because she is a mother. Flooded with anger, she also finds her life's work: to study and fight sexism, in the workplace, in academia, and at home. Strober's generous memoir captures the spirit of a revolution lived fully, from her Brooklyn childhood (and her shock at age twelve when she's banished to the women's balcony atshul) to her groundbreaking Stanford seminar on women and work. Strober's interest in women and work began when she saw her mother's frustration at the limitations of her position as a secretary. Her consciousness of the unfairness of the usual distribution of household chores came when she unsuccessfully asked her husband for help with housework. Later, when a group of conservative white male professors sputtered at the idea of government-subsidized child care, Strober made the case for its economic benefits."--Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Strober's moving memoir chronicles the development of a feminist economist from childhood to the present. Strober, who completed her economics PhD at MIT in 1969, taught at UC Berkeley and then Stanford for the majority of her career. She weaves her personal journey into a larger accounting of the state of academics for women in the last third of the 20th century. Strober is a firsthand witness to the increased influx of women into professional schools during the 1970s and 1980s. She also experienced the challenge of being one of the first woman professors in the Stanford Business School, and the lack of support from peers, along with balancing the challenges of work and family life. The memoir also chronicles Strober's own journey of intellectual discovery as to how to incorporate feminist methodology and analysis into her own research. Her salient work on caring labor and occupational sex segregation advances the field of economics in general and feminist economics in particular, and Strober plays a key role in the founding and development of the feminist economics movement and its eventual professional association. A unique read, given the paucity of extended accounts from pioneering female economists. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. --Joyce P. Jacobsen, Wesleyan University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.