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Peace through entrepreneurship : investing in a startup culture for security and development / Steven R. Koltai with Matthew Muspratt.

By: Koltai, Steven R [author.].
Contributor(s): Muspratt, Matthew [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Washington, DC : Brookings Institution Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resource (xxi, 213 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780815729242; 0815729243.Subject(s): Entrepreneurship -- Social aspects | Economic development -- Social aspects | Security, International | Entrepreneurship -- Developing countries | Peace-building -- Developing countries | Civil society -- Developing countries | Economic assistance, American -- Developing countriesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Peace through entrepreneurshipDDC classification: 338/.04 Other classification: POL012000 | BUS025000 | BUS072000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "Joblessness is the root cause of the global unrest threatening American security. Fostering entrepreneurship is the remedy. The combined weight of American diplomacy and military power cannot end unrest and extremism in the Middle East and other troubled regions of the world, Steven Koltai argues. Could an alternative approach work? Koltai says yes: by investing in entrepreneurship, and reaping the benefits of the jobs created through entrepreneurial startups. From 9/11 and the Arab Spring to the self-proclaimed Islamic caliphate, instability and terror breed where young men cannot find jobs. Koltai marshals evidence to show that joblessness - not religious or cultural conflict - is the root cause of the unrest that vexes American foreign policy and threatens international security. Drawing on Koltai's stint as Senior Adviser for Entrepreneurship in Secretary Hillary Clinton's State Department, and his thirty-year career as a successful entrepreneur and business executive, World Peace through Entrepreneurship argues for the significant elevation of entrepreneurship in the service of foreign policy. This entrepreneurship is not rural microfinance or mercantile trading. It is the scalable stuff of Silicon Valley and Sam Walton, generating the vast majority of new jobs in economies large and small. World Peace through Entrepreneurship offers a nonmilitary, long-term solution at a time of disillusionment with Washington's "big development" approach to unstable and underdeveloped parts of the world - and when the new normal is fear of terrorist attacks against Western targets, beheadings in Syria, and jihad. Extremism will not be resolved by a war on terror. The answer, Koltai shows, is stimulating economic opportunities for the virtually limitless supply of desperate, unemployed young men and women leading lives of endless economic frustration. Those opportunities will come through entrepreneurship"-- Provided by publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HB615 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7864/j.ctt1dgn6g8 Available ocn946255043

Includes bibliographical references (pages 173-199) and index.

"Joblessness is the root cause of the global unrest threatening American security. Fostering entrepreneurship is the remedy. The combined weight of American diplomacy and military power cannot end unrest and extremism in the Middle East and other troubled regions of the world, Steven Koltai argues. Could an alternative approach work? Koltai says yes: by investing in entrepreneurship, and reaping the benefits of the jobs created through entrepreneurial startups. From 9/11 and the Arab Spring to the self-proclaimed Islamic caliphate, instability and terror breed where young men cannot find jobs. Koltai marshals evidence to show that joblessness - not religious or cultural conflict - is the root cause of the unrest that vexes American foreign policy and threatens international security. Drawing on Koltai's stint as Senior Adviser for Entrepreneurship in Secretary Hillary Clinton's State Department, and his thirty-year career as a successful entrepreneur and business executive, World Peace through Entrepreneurship argues for the significant elevation of entrepreneurship in the service of foreign policy. This entrepreneurship is not rural microfinance or mercantile trading. It is the scalable stuff of Silicon Valley and Sam Walton, generating the vast majority of new jobs in economies large and small. World Peace through Entrepreneurship offers a nonmilitary, long-term solution at a time of disillusionment with Washington's "big development" approach to unstable and underdeveloped parts of the world - and when the new normal is fear of terrorist attacks against Western targets, beheadings in Syria, and jihad. Extremism will not be resolved by a war on terror. The answer, Koltai shows, is stimulating economic opportunities for the virtually limitless supply of desperate, unemployed young men and women leading lives of endless economic frustration. Those opportunities will come through entrepreneurship"-- Provided by publisher.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (JSTOR, viewed October 17, 2016).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Koltai (guest scholar, Brookings Institution; managing director, entrepreneurship consultancy firm Koltai & Co.) has had experience as an entrepreneur in several business areas and served as senior advisor for entrepreneurship in the U.S. State Department from 2009 to 2011. The Global Entrepreneurship Program was developed during this period. Koltai believes strongly that unemployment throughout the world, but particularly in the Middle East, is a root cause of terrorism and that entrepreneurism can and should be a partial remedy. He builds on this thesis throughout the first half of the book and relates his time at the State Department. With Koltai & Co. director Muspratt, the author then proposes various scenarios to solve some of the problems associated with carrying out entrepreneurial ventures at the State Department and presents models for going forward describing the who, what, why, and where of his plans. VERDICT Koltai's arguments are well presented and tested through practical application. This title should be available to readers in all types of libraries.-Littleton Maxwell, -Robins Sch. of Business, Univ. of Richmond © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Steven R. Koltai is a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution and managing director of the entrepreneurship consultancy Koltai and Co. LLC. He is a successful entrepreneur in the telecommunications and event management industries, and from 2009-11 served as Senior Advisor for Entrepreneurship under Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.<br> <br> Matthew Muspratt is a writer and consultant with expertise in Sub Saharan Africa. He consults on entrepreneurship with Koltai & Co. and has worked in several African countries as a legal adviser to banks, social enterprises, and an access-to-justice organization.

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