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Spider web : the birth of American anticommunism / Nick Fischer.

By: Fischer, Nick.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252098222; 0252098226.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Spider web.DDC classification: 324.1/309730904 Other classification: POL005000 | HIS036060 | POL013000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Chapter 1. The Origins of American Anticommunism, ca. 1860-1917 -- Chapter 2. The First World War and the Origins of the Red Scare -- Chapter 3. Here Come the Bolsheviks! : The Russian Revolution and the Red Scare -- Chapter 4. The Spider Web Chart -- Chapter 5. Mapping a Political Network : The Anticommunist Spider Web -- Chapter 6. John Bond Trevor, Radicals, Eugenics, and Immigration -- Chapter 7. Jacob Spolansky : The Rise of the Career Anticommunist Spook -- Chapter 8. The Better America Federation and Big Business's War on Labor -- Chapter 9. Political Repression and Culture War -- Chapter 10. Anticommunism and Political Terror -- Chapter 11. The Mythology of Anticommunism -- Chapter 12. Antidemocracy and Authoritarianism -- Conclusion: Legacies of the Spider Web -- Afterword.
Scope and content: "The McCarthy-era witch hunts marked the culmination of an anticommunist crusade launched after the First World War. With Bolshevism triumphant in Russia and public discontent shaking the United States, conservatives at every level of government and business created a network dedicated to sweeping away the 'spider web' of radicalism they saw threatening the nation. In this groundbreaking study, Nick Fischer shines a light on right-wing activities during the interwar period. Conservatives, eager to dispel communism's appeal to the working class, railed against a supposed Soviet-directed conspiracy composed of socialists, trade unions, peace and civil liberties groups, feminists, liberals, aliens, and Jews. Their rhetoric and power made for devastating weapons in their systematic war for control of the country against progressive causes. But, as Fischer shows, the term spider web far more accurately described the anticommunist movement than it did the makeup and operations of international communism. Fischer details how anticommunist myths and propaganda influenced mainstream politics in America, and how its ongoing efforts paved the way for the McCarthyite Fifties--and augured the conservative backlash that would one day transform American politics"-- Provided by publisher.
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E743.5 .F476 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt18j8x4m Available ocn948297292
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E743.5 -- .K35 1989 The Liberals and J. Edgar Hoover : E743.5 -- .L56 2014 Little 'Red Scares' : E743.5 .D374 2014 Red apple : E743.5 .F476 2016 Spider web : E743.5 .G63 2013 Loyalty and liberty : E743.5.H55 J33 2009 Alger Hiss and the battle for history / E743.5 .L56 2013 Little 'Red Scares' :

"The McCarthy-era witch hunts marked the culmination of an anticommunist crusade launched after the First World War. With Bolshevism triumphant in Russia and public discontent shaking the United States, conservatives at every level of government and business created a network dedicated to sweeping away the 'spider web' of radicalism they saw threatening the nation. In this groundbreaking study, Nick Fischer shines a light on right-wing activities during the interwar period. Conservatives, eager to dispel communism's appeal to the working class, railed against a supposed Soviet-directed conspiracy composed of socialists, trade unions, peace and civil liberties groups, feminists, liberals, aliens, and Jews. Their rhetoric and power made for devastating weapons in their systematic war for control of the country against progressive causes. But, as Fischer shows, the term spider web far more accurately described the anticommunist movement than it did the makeup and operations of international communism. Fischer details how anticommunist myths and propaganda influenced mainstream politics in America, and how its ongoing efforts paved the way for the McCarthyite Fifties--and augured the conservative backlash that would one day transform American politics"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Chapter 1. The Origins of American Anticommunism, ca. 1860-1917 -- Chapter 2. The First World War and the Origins of the Red Scare -- Chapter 3. Here Come the Bolsheviks! : The Russian Revolution and the Red Scare -- Chapter 4. The Spider Web Chart -- Chapter 5. Mapping a Political Network : The Anticommunist Spider Web -- Chapter 6. John Bond Trevor, Radicals, Eugenics, and Immigration -- Chapter 7. Jacob Spolansky : The Rise of the Career Anticommunist Spook -- Chapter 8. The Better America Federation and Big Business's War on Labor -- Chapter 9. Political Repression and Culture War -- Chapter 10. Anticommunism and Political Terror -- Chapter 11. The Mythology of Anticommunism -- Chapter 12. Antidemocracy and Authoritarianism -- Conclusion: Legacies of the Spider Web -- Afterword.

Print version record.

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