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Equality on trial : gender and rights in the modern American workplace / Katherine Turk.

By: Turk, Katherine [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Politics and culture in modern America: Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc. [2016]Description: 1 online resource (284 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0812292839; 9780812292831.Subject(s): Sex discrimination against women -- United States -- History | Sex discrimination against women -- Law and legislation -- United States | Sex discrimination in employment -- United States -- History | Sex discrimination in employment -- Law and legislation -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Equality on trial.DDC classification: 331.4/1330973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Notions of sex equality -- Defining sex discrimination -- Class and class action -- Feminism and workplace fairness -- Reevaluating women's work -- Sex equality and the service sector -- A man's world, but only for some -- Opting out or buying in -- Illusions of sex equality.
Summary: "In 1964, as part of its landmark Civil Rights Act, Congress outlawed workplace discrimination on the basis of such personal attributes as sex, race, and religion. This provision, known as Title VII, laid a new legal foundation for women's rights at work. Though President Kennedy and other lawmakers expressed high hopes for Title VII, early attempts to enforce it were inconsistent. In the absence of a consensus definition of sex equality in the law or society, Title VII's practical meaning was far from certain. The first history to foreground Title VII's sex provision, Equality on Trial examines how the law's initial promise inspired a generation of Americans to dispatch expansive notions of sex equality. Imagining new solidarities and building a broad class politics, these workers and activists engaged Title VII to generate a pivotal battle over the terms of democracy and the role of the state in all labor relationships. But the law's ambiguity also allowed for narrow conceptions of sex equality to take hold. Conservatives found ways to bend Title VII's possible meanings to their benefit, discovering that a narrow definition of sex equality allowed businesses to comply with the law without transforming basic workplace structures or ceding power to workers. These contests to fix the meaning of sex equality ultimately laid the legal and cultural foundation for the neoliberal work regimes that enabled some women to break the glass ceiling as employers lowered the floor for everyone else. Synthesizing the histories of work, social movements, and civil rights in the postwar United States, Equality on Trial recovers the range of protagonists whose struggles forged the contemporary meanings of feminism, fairness, and labor rights"--Book jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF3467 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1btc5x9 Available ocn948780928

Description based on print version record.

Includes bibliographical references (pages [213]-272) and index.

Notions of sex equality -- Defining sex discrimination -- Class and class action -- Feminism and workplace fairness -- Reevaluating women's work -- Sex equality and the service sector -- A man's world, but only for some -- Opting out or buying in -- Illusions of sex equality.

"In 1964, as part of its landmark Civil Rights Act, Congress outlawed workplace discrimination on the basis of such personal attributes as sex, race, and religion. This provision, known as Title VII, laid a new legal foundation for women's rights at work. Though President Kennedy and other lawmakers expressed high hopes for Title VII, early attempts to enforce it were inconsistent. In the absence of a consensus definition of sex equality in the law or society, Title VII's practical meaning was far from certain. The first history to foreground Title VII's sex provision, Equality on Trial examines how the law's initial promise inspired a generation of Americans to dispatch expansive notions of sex equality. Imagining new solidarities and building a broad class politics, these workers and activists engaged Title VII to generate a pivotal battle over the terms of democracy and the role of the state in all labor relationships. But the law's ambiguity also allowed for narrow conceptions of sex equality to take hold. Conservatives found ways to bend Title VII's possible meanings to their benefit, discovering that a narrow definition of sex equality allowed businesses to comply with the law without transforming basic workplace structures or ceding power to workers. These contests to fix the meaning of sex equality ultimately laid the legal and cultural foundation for the neoliberal work regimes that enabled some women to break the glass ceiling as employers lowered the floor for everyone else. Synthesizing the histories of work, social movements, and civil rights in the postwar United States, Equality on Trial recovers the range of protagonists whose struggles forged the contemporary meanings of feminism, fairness, and labor rights"--Book jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Turk (UNC-Chapel Hill) provides a historical perspective of US gender equality in compensation from the Civil Rights Act, Title VII (1964), to the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act (2009). Inputs from many relevant organizations are described. These include a variety of government, business, and worker organizations: Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, AT&T, PT&T, National Organization for Women, New York Times Women's Caucus, American Nurses Association, American Civil Liberties Union, Hotel Trades Council. Many issues for men and women are discussed: sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual orientation, racism, workplace fairness, evaluation of women's work, comparable worth, maternity and sick leave policies, "queer" work, men nurses, interchangeability of various activities. Turk concludes that, due to Title VII, using gender stereotypes to determine compensation has been reduced, improving compensation offers to both men and women. However, she finds that some privileges for white, professional, masculine, and heterosexual workers remain, and providing these privileges presents some organizational costs. She asks society to improve workplace equality in terms of compensation, worker control over the structure of work, and workers' lives after "the workday is done." Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Frieda Reitman, Pace University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Katherine Turk is Associate Professor of History and Adjunct Associate Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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