Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Hope for common ground : mediating the personal and the political in a divided church / Julie Hanlon Rubio.

By: Rubio, Julie Hanlon [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Moral traditions series: Publisher: Washington, DC : Georgetown University Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (xxi, 242 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781626163072; 1626163073.Subject(s): Christian sociology -- Catholic Church | Christian sociology -- United States | Social ethics -- United States | Church and social problems -- Catholic Church | Church and social problems -- United States | Christianity and politics -- Catholic Church | Christianity and politics -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Hope for common ground.DDC classification: 261.80973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction : Reasons for Hope in a Divided Church -- Part I. Foundations for Common Ground. Chapter One. Faithful Citizenship : Is There Hope for Politics? Chapter Two. Cooperation with Evil: Personal Responsibility for Social Problems. Chapter Three: Why Bother to Act Locally? -- Part II. Cases. Chapter Four. What Does It Mean to Be Pro-Marriage? Chapter Five. Poverty Reduction : a Social Virtue Ethic. Chapter Six. Abortion : Toward Cooperation with Good. Chapter Seven. End of Life Care : Enabling Better Practices of Dying. Conclusion : Francis and Ferguson.
Summary: Much like American society, the American Catholic Church is sharply divided: conservatives see government as the problem while liberals see government intervention as necessary. From the high point of Catholic consensus in the early 1960s with the election of John F. Kennedy, today Catholics in this country are less united than at any point in their history. Not only do Catholics disagree on abortion, same-sex marriage, physician-assisted suicide, and social spending, but they also disagree about what the major social problems are. Despite these rancorous divisions, many Catholics share concerns about avoiding cooperation with evil and working within communities to solve social problems. Rubio tries to expand this existing common ground and argues, with a vision of what she calls faithful citizenship, that more can be done at the local level if those on the right and the left could come and reason together instead of remaining mired in tired debates over political v. personal morality. Rubio uses this framework of common ground to analyze four hot-button ethical and policy issues--the family, poverty, abortion, and end-of-life care--in the hope of initiating dialogue and inspiring communal action.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
BX1406.3 .R83 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1c3snfw Available ocn950460022

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction : Reasons for Hope in a Divided Church -- Part I. Foundations for Common Ground. Chapter One. Faithful Citizenship : Is There Hope for Politics? Chapter Two. Cooperation with Evil: Personal Responsibility for Social Problems. Chapter Three: Why Bother to Act Locally? -- Part II. Cases. Chapter Four. What Does It Mean to Be Pro-Marriage? Chapter Five. Poverty Reduction : a Social Virtue Ethic. Chapter Six. Abortion : Toward Cooperation with Good. Chapter Seven. End of Life Care : Enabling Better Practices of Dying. Conclusion : Francis and Ferguson.

Much like American society, the American Catholic Church is sharply divided: conservatives see government as the problem while liberals see government intervention as necessary. From the high point of Catholic consensus in the early 1960s with the election of John F. Kennedy, today Catholics in this country are less united than at any point in their history. Not only do Catholics disagree on abortion, same-sex marriage, physician-assisted suicide, and social spending, but they also disagree about what the major social problems are. Despite these rancorous divisions, many Catholics share concerns about avoiding cooperation with evil and working within communities to solve social problems. Rubio tries to expand this existing common ground and argues, with a vision of what she calls faithful citizenship, that more can be done at the local level if those on the right and the left could come and reason together instead of remaining mired in tired debates over political v. personal morality. Rubio uses this framework of common ground to analyze four hot-button ethical and policy issues--the family, poverty, abortion, and end-of-life care--in the hope of initiating dialogue and inspiring communal action.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In a time of vitriolic political discourse, Rubio's carefully articulated call for common ground in four particularly divisive ethical controversies--those surrounding marriage/family, poverty, abortion, and euthanasia--is refreshing. Though honoring the separation of church and state, Rubio (Christian ethics, St. Louis University) draws on her deep commitment to Roman Catholic social teaching in looking at pluralistic ethical perspectives. She attempts to find a "third space": localized strategies for social change that stand between--but do not abandon--the political and the personal. Rubio argues that community initiatives ought to be prioritized, but political, large-scale solutions must also be taken into consideration. In making a case for taking personal responsibility, she grounds her discussion in compelling arguments to avoid complicity in structural evil--which, she believes, activists on both the Left and the Right already readily grasp. Rubio's "hope is that finding a common way to think about cooperation with evil will enable people of different perspectives to act together in the space between the personal and political." But one wonders whether longstanding ideological adversaries such as pro-life and pro-choice activists can really come together to find common ground. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers. --Peter K. Steinfeld, Buena Vista University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Julie Hanlon Rubio is a professor of Christian ethics at St. Louis University. She is the author of Family Ethics: Practices for Christians (GUP 2010) and A Christian Theology of Marriage and Family , and coeditor of Readings in Moral Theology No. 15: Marriage .</p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.