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American power and liberal order : a conservative internationalist grand strategy / Paul D. Miller.

By: Miller, Paul D [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Georgetown University Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781626163430; 162616343X.Subject(s): Security, International | National security -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: American power and liberal orderDDC classification: 327.73 LOC classification: JZ1480Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
A framework for thinking about U.S. grand strategy -- In search of a 21st century grand strategy -- Power and liberty : a history -- The new world disorder -- Strategic courses of action -- The balance of power and the democratic peace -- Barbarians, failed states, and stability operations -- Regional application -- The frontline : Europe and East Asia -- The opportunity : South Asia -- The quagmire : the Middle East -- The periphery : Latin America and Africa -- The national security toolkit -- Homeland defense -- Diplomacy and development -- Military, intelligence, and national security decision-making -- Conclusion.
Summary: Contrary to widespread belief, the United States has been following a broadly consistent grand strategy across presidential administrations for more than a century by using American power to create and expand the liberal international system. This liberal order is the outer perimeter of American security. Today, after the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, some are calling for a policy of restraint or pulling back because they believe America is relatively safe and its resources are overstretched. Paul D. Miller argues that they are wrong. American security and the liberal international order need US leadership and are in jeopardy from nuclear-armed autocracies, violent non-state actors, and the failed states who harbor them. In response, the United States should not pull back but should continue to promote five pillars of American grand strategy: maintaining a favorable balance of power among the great powers, defending the U.S. homeland from attack, promoting democracy, investing in good governance abroad, and punishing rogue actors that threaten allies or the stability of the international system. Miller does however call for reprioitzing where around the globe the United States should focus its energies in the future, and he proposes common sense reforms to the US national security state so as to better manage foreign policy.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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JZ1480 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1ffjnqs Available ocn950611489

Includes bibliographical references and index.

A framework for thinking about U.S. grand strategy -- In search of a 21st century grand strategy -- Power and liberty : a history -- The new world disorder -- Strategic courses of action -- The balance of power and the democratic peace -- Barbarians, failed states, and stability operations -- Regional application -- The frontline : Europe and East Asia -- The opportunity : South Asia -- The quagmire : the Middle East -- The periphery : Latin America and Africa -- The national security toolkit -- Homeland defense -- Diplomacy and development -- Military, intelligence, and national security decision-making -- Conclusion.

Contrary to widespread belief, the United States has been following a broadly consistent grand strategy across presidential administrations for more than a century by using American power to create and expand the liberal international system. This liberal order is the outer perimeter of American security. Today, after the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, some are calling for a policy of restraint or pulling back because they believe America is relatively safe and its resources are overstretched. Paul D. Miller argues that they are wrong. American security and the liberal international order need US leadership and are in jeopardy from nuclear-armed autocracies, violent non-state actors, and the failed states who harbor them. In response, the United States should not pull back but should continue to promote five pillars of American grand strategy: maintaining a favorable balance of power among the great powers, defending the U.S. homeland from attack, promoting democracy, investing in good governance abroad, and punishing rogue actors that threaten allies or the stability of the international system. Miller does however call for reprioitzing where around the globe the United States should focus its energies in the future, and he proposes common sense reforms to the US national security state so as to better manage foreign policy.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Paul D. Miller is the associate director of the Clements Center for National Security at The University of Texas at Austin and an adjunct political scientist at the RAND Corporation. He previously held the position of Director for Afghanistan and Pakistan on the National Security Council from 2007 to 2009, worked as an analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency, and served as a military intelligence analyst with the US Army in Afghanistan. He is the author of Armed State Building: Confronting State Failure, 1898-2012 .</p>

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