Projecting race : postwar America, civil rights and documentary film / Stephen Charbonneau.

By: Charbonneau, Stephen [author.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: London : Wallflower Press, [2016]Copyright date: ß2016Description: 1 online resource (x, 208 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0231850956; 9780231850957Subject(s): Documentary films -- United States -- History and criticismAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 791.4309 LOC classification: PN1995.9.D6 | C4365 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Projecting Race presents a history of educational documentary filmmaking in the postwar era in light of race relations and the fight for civil rights. Drawing on extensive archival research and textual analyses, the volume tracks the evolution of race-based, nontheatrical cinema from its neorealist roots to its incorporation of new documentary techniques intent on recording reality in real time. The films featured include classic documentaries, such as Sidney Meyers's The Quiet One (1948), and a range of familiar and less familiar state-sponsored educational documentaries from George Stoney (Palmour Street, 1950; All My Babies, 1953; and The Man in the Middle, 1966) and the Drew Associates (Another Way, 1967). Final chapters highlight community-development films jointly produced by the National Film Board of Canada and the Office of Economic Opportunity (The Farmersville Project, 1968; The Hartford Project, 1969) in rural and industrial settings. Featuring testimonies from farm workers, activists, and government officials, the films reflect communities in crisis, where organized and politically active racial minorities upended the status quo. Ultimately, this work traces the postwar contours of a liberal racial outlook as government agencies came to grips with profound and inescapable social change.
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PN1995.9.D6 B435 2014 Documentary as Exorcism : PN1995.9.D6 B59 2008 French colonial documentary : PN1995.9.D6 C4345 2015 A New History of British Documentary. PN1995.9.D6 C4365 2016 Projecting race : PN1995.9 .D6 C5345 2012 Playing to the Camera : PN1995.9.D6C69 2011 Recording Reality, Desiring the Real. PN1995.9.D6 C69 2011 Recording reality, desiring the real /

Includes bibliographical references (pages 191-201) and index.

Print version record.

Projecting Race presents a history of educational documentary filmmaking in the postwar era in light of race relations and the fight for civil rights. Drawing on extensive archival research and textual analyses, the volume tracks the evolution of race-based, nontheatrical cinema from its neorealist roots to its incorporation of new documentary techniques intent on recording reality in real time. The films featured include classic documentaries, such as Sidney Meyers's The Quiet One (1948), and a range of familiar and less familiar state-sponsored educational documentaries from George Stoney (Palmour Street, 1950; All My Babies, 1953; and The Man in the Middle, 1966) and the Drew Associates (Another Way, 1967). Final chapters highlight community-development films jointly produced by the National Film Board of Canada and the Office of Economic Opportunity (The Farmersville Project, 1968; The Hartford Project, 1969) in rural and industrial settings. Featuring testimonies from farm workers, activists, and government officials, the films reflect communities in crisis, where organized and politically active racial minorities upended the status quo. Ultimately, this work traces the postwar contours of a liberal racial outlook as government agencies came to grips with profound and inescapable social change.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Stephen Charbonneau is associate professor of film studies at Florida Atlantic University. His work on media pedagogy, youth media, and documentary film has been published in Jump Cut , Journal of Popular Film & Television , Framework , Spectator , and Journal of Popular Culture .

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