Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Korea's grievous war / Su-kyoung Hwang.

By: Hwang, Su-kyoung.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Pennsylvania studies in human rights: Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc., 2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0812293118; 9780812293111.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Korea's grievous war.DDC classification: 951.904/2 LOC classification: DS918 | .H83 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Note on Transcriptions and Testimonies; List of Abbreviations; Introduction; Chapter 1. Terror in Cheju Island; Chapter 2. Emergency Laws and the Crisis of Human Rights; Chapter 3. Ideological Persecution and the Massacre of 1950; Chapter 4. Observing Political Violence in Korea; Chapter 5. Politics of Fear in the Bombing of Korea; Chapter 6. The Bereaved Families; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Acknowledgments.
Summary: Korea's Grievous War presents the historical background, political motivations, legal bases, and social consequences of anticommunist violence, tracing the enduring legacy of this destruction in the testimonies of survivors and bereaved families that only now can give voice to the lived experience of the grievous war and its aftermath.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS918 .H83 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1d392b7 Available ocn953602331

Print version record.

Korea's Grievous War presents the historical background, political motivations, legal bases, and social consequences of anticommunist violence, tracing the enduring legacy of this destruction in the testimonies of survivors and bereaved families that only now can give voice to the lived experience of the grievous war and its aftermath.

Cover; Contents; Note on Transcriptions and Testimonies; List of Abbreviations; Introduction; Chapter 1. Terror in Cheju Island; Chapter 2. Emergency Laws and the Crisis of Human Rights; Chapter 3. Ideological Persecution and the Massacre of 1950; Chapter 4. Observing Political Violence in Korea; Chapter 5. Politics of Fear in the Bombing of Korea; Chapter 6. The Bereaved Families; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Acknowledgments.

Includes bibliographical references ([227]-239) and index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Hwang (Univ. of Sydney) writes not of America's forgotten war but of Korea's misunderstood one: a civil war that began in 1948 with Syngman Rhee's rise to power and continued until after the July 1953 armistice, whose surviving victims did not dare share their memories during 35 subsequent years of dictatorship for fear of incriminating themselves anew. Only after President Chun Doo Hwan's 1988 departure could they speak, and Hwang's interviews highlight Rhee's excesses in a way that cannot possibly be forgotten. She has also uncovered new evidence in the Republic of Korea (ROK) and US National Archives; the latter indicate a US Army presence at mass executions formerly thought to have been conducted by Rhee's police in secret. Hwang does not excuse North Korean atrocities, but her treatment of the 1948 Jeju counterinsurgency, subsequent emergency laws, persecutions, and US acquiescence in all of the above supplies an apt counterpoise. Less compelling are her characterizations of later US/UN air operations as terror bombing unalloyed by any tactical or operational purpose and McCarthyism without a proper nod to the more cynical aspect of partisan one-upmanship that drove both it and Truman's Federal Loyalty Program. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --John L.S. Daley, Pittsburg State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Su-kyoung Hwang teaches Korean studies at the University of Sydney.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.