At the mercy of their clothes : modernism, the middlebrow, and British garment culture / Celia Marshik.

By: Marshik, Celia [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Modernist latitudesPublisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231542968; 0231542968Subject(s): Clothing and dress in literature | Clothing and dress -- Social aspects -- Great Britain -- History | Modernism (Literature) -- Great Britain | Identity (Psychology) in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: At the mercy of their clothesDDC classification: 820.9/3564 LOC classification: PR478.C58Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: At the mercy of their clothes -- What do women want? at the mercy of the evening gown -- Wearable memorials: into and out of the trenches with the modern Mac -- Aspiration to the extraordinary: materializing the subject through fancy dress -- Serialized selves: style, identity, and the problem of the used garment -- Coda: Precious clothing.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PR478.C58 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/mars17504 Available ocn954203961

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: At the mercy of their clothes -- What do women want? at the mercy of the evening gown -- Wearable memorials: into and out of the trenches with the modern Mac -- Aspiration to the extraordinary: materializing the subject through fancy dress -- Serialized selves: style, identity, and the problem of the used garment -- Coda: Precious clothing.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Marshik (Stony Brook Univ.) looks at the way fashions were used in both middlebrow and modernist literature from the early 20th century to WW II. Covering four basic categories of dress--evening wear, the mackintosh, costumes, and used clothing--she considers how authors of literary works used these four types of clothing as shorthand for social roles and expectations of particular characters. She also discusses the ways in which the relationship between subject (the character) and object (what he or she wears) changed as a result of wars and the social disruptions that accompanied them. Though Marshik does a good job of straddling the line between history and literary theory, the literary jargon she uses may be confusing to readers outside the discipline. And as is always the case with monographs of this sort, Marshik's argument will resonate more with those familiar with the books and stories she uses as examples. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Rachel Anne Standish, San Joaquin Delta College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Celia Marshik is professor of English at Stony Brook University. She is the author of British Modernism and Censorship (2006) and the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Modernist Culture (2014).

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