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Benjamin Britten and Russia / Cameron Pyke.

By: Pyke, Cameron [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Aldeburgh studies in music: v. 11.Publisher: Woodbridge : The Boydell Press, 2016Copyright date: ß2016Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 367 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1782046313; 9781782046318.Subject(s): Composers -- Russia -- Influence | Composers -- Soviet Union -- InfluenceAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 780.92 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Frontcover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Note on Transliteration and Sources; 1 Earliest and Lifelong Russophilia; 2 Britten and Shostakovich, 1934-63; 3 Britten and Prokofiev; 4 Britten and Stravinsky; 5 Hospitality and Politics; 6 Pushkin and Performance; 7 Britten and Shostakovich Again: Dialogues of War and Death, 1963-76; Conclusion; Appendices; 1 Letter from Lord Armstrong of Ilminster; 2 Interview with Alan Brooke Turner; 3 Interview with Keith Grant; 4 Interview with Lord Harewood; 5 Interview with Victor Hochhauser.
6 Interview with Lilian Hochhauser7 Letter from Sir Charles Mackerras; 8 Interview with Donald Mitchell; 9 Interview with Sir John Morgan; 10 Interview with Gennady Rozhdestvensky; 11 Interview with Irina Shostakovich; 12 Letter from Boris Tishchenko; 13 Interview with Oleg Vinogradov; 14 Interview with Galina Vishnevskaya; 15 Letters from Dmitri Smirnov and Elena Firsova; 16 Letter from Vladislav Chernushenko; 17 Britten's Volumes of Tchaikovsky's Complete Works; Bibliography and Sources; Index.
Summary: Explores Benjamin Britten's deeply-felt cultural affinity with Russia and influences on the 'Russian' Britten.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML410.B853 P95 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt19x3hh6 Available ocn957318379

Includes bibliographical references (pages 332-350), discography (pages 350-351) , filmography (page 351) , and index.

Print version record.

Frontcover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Note on Transliteration and Sources; 1 Earliest and Lifelong Russophilia; 2 Britten and Shostakovich, 1934-63; 3 Britten and Prokofiev; 4 Britten and Stravinsky; 5 Hospitality and Politics; 6 Pushkin and Performance; 7 Britten and Shostakovich Again: Dialogues of War and Death, 1963-76; Conclusion; Appendices; 1 Letter from Lord Armstrong of Ilminster; 2 Interview with Alan Brooke Turner; 3 Interview with Keith Grant; 4 Interview with Lord Harewood; 5 Interview with Victor Hochhauser.

6 Interview with Lilian Hochhauser7 Letter from Sir Charles Mackerras; 8 Interview with Donald Mitchell; 9 Interview with Sir John Morgan; 10 Interview with Gennady Rozhdestvensky; 11 Interview with Irina Shostakovich; 12 Letter from Boris Tishchenko; 13 Interview with Oleg Vinogradov; 14 Interview with Galina Vishnevskaya; 15 Letters from Dmitri Smirnov and Elena Firsova; 16 Letter from Vladislav Chernushenko; 17 Britten's Volumes of Tchaikovsky's Complete Works; Bibliography and Sources; Index.

Explores Benjamin Britten's deeply-felt cultural affinity with Russia and influences on the 'Russian' Britten.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this exceptionally well-written, thoroughly researched study, Pyke (Dulwich College and Univ. of London, UK) explores ways Benjamin Britten (1913-76) engaged with Russian composers, musicians, and literature against the backdrop of Anglo-Soviet cultural and political relationships. Pyke organizes the book thematically, but there is a broad chronological shape to the whole. The first four chapters are devoted to Tchaikovsky, Shostakovich, Prokofiev, and Stravinsky, the Russian composers whose music most appealed to Britten. Pyke's nuanced discussion of Britten's changing and problematic relationship with Stravinsky is welcome and provides context for understanding why Shostakovich became so important to Britten. The fifth chapter focuses on Britten's visits to the Soviet Union in the 1960s and early 1970s. Chapter 6 considers Pushkin's influence on Britten and the composer's engagement with Russian performance styles. The final chapter returns to Britten and Shostakovich, focusing on their friendship in later life and their concerns regarding war and death. Drawing from journals, letters, interviews, reviews, and Britten's library of scores, Pyke offers an insightful analysis of Britten's compositions, complete with many notated examples, highlighting Britten's preoccupations in light of the quartet of featured Russian composers. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Stanley Clyde Pelkey, Florida State University

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