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The burden of the ancients : Maya ceremonies of world renewal from the Pre-Columbian period to the present / Allen J. Christenson.

By: Christenson, Allen J, 1957- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Linda Schele series in Maya and pre-Columbian studies: Publisher: Austin : University of Texas Press, 2016Edition: First edition.Description: 1 online resource (pages cm).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781477309964; 1477309969; 9781477309971; 1477309977.Subject(s): Holy Week -- Guatemala -- Santiago Atitlán | Tzutuhil Indians -- Rites and ceremonies | Tzutuhil Indians -- Religion | Mayas -- Religious life and customs | Mayas -- Religion | Mayas -- Rites and ceremoniesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Burden of the ancients.DDC classification: 299.7/842 LOC classification: F1435.3.R56Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Pre-Columbian rituals of world renewal in Yucatan -- New year's ceremonies in the Maya highlands -- Easter and the Spanish conquest -- Post-conquest ceremonies of world renewal -- Holy Monday -- Holy Tuesday -- Holy Wednesday -- Holy Thursday -- Good Friday -- Aftermath and conclusions.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F1435.3.R56 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7560/309957 Available ocn957701202

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Pre-Columbian rituals of world renewal in Yucatan -- New year's ceremonies in the Maya highlands -- Easter and the Spanish conquest -- Post-conquest ceremonies of world renewal -- Holy Monday -- Holy Tuesday -- Holy Wednesday -- Holy Thursday -- Good Friday -- Aftermath and conclusions.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Art historian Christenson (BYU) is best known for his new critical translation of the K'iche' Maya book Popol Vuh (2007). In this work, he turns to the Tz'utujil Maya of highland Guatemala, the town of Santiago Atitlán, and the cult of the revered, controversial deity called Maximón. That cult has been at the center of several other works from this region of Guatemala. Christenson's, however, is the most comprehensive treatment yet attempted. Maximón is a god who rises to rule the world each year during the days of Holy Week when Jesus Christ is dead and not yet risen again. Half the book presents a rich and engaging description of the day-by-day progression of the worship of Maximón during Easter week. Half the book examines more broadly pre-conquest and colonial Maya traditions of world renewal during end-of-year festivities. Christenson argues convincingly that the Maximón tradition recapitulates pre-conquest Maya beliefs that during the colonial period found a proper place for their expression in Christians' annual celebration of the death and resurrection of their Lord. An important new contribution to the general study of enduring, ancient Maya traditions adapted to serve in modern times. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Paul R. Sullivan, independent scholar

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