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At the core and in the margins : incorporation of Mexican immigrants in two rural Midwestern communities / Julia Albarracín.

By: Albarracín, Julia [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Latinos in the United States series: Publisher: East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (xxxvii, 175 pages ): illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781609174927; 1609174925.Subject(s): Mexican Americans -- Cultural assimilation -- Illinois | Mexican Americans -- Illinois -- Statistics | Mexican Americans -- Illinois -- Interviews | Immigrants -- Illinois -- Social conditions | Immigrants -- Illinois -- Statistics | Social surveys -- Illinois | Beardstown (Ill.) -- Ethnic relations | Monmouth (Ill.) -- Ethnic relationsAdditional physical formats: No titleDDC classification: 305.8968/720773 Other classification: SOC044000 | SOC026020 | POL038000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Cases of Beardstown and Monmouth, Illinois -- Becoming Citizens? -- The Culture of Incorporation : Language Use, Identity, and Social Connectedness -- The Context of Reception : Discrimination and Acceptance -- The Politics of Incorporation : Participation -- More on Political Incorporation : Trust in Government Institutions -- Concluding Remarks -- Appendix: Survey Instrument.
Scope and content: "Beardstown and Monmouth, Illinois, two rural Midwestern towns, have been transformed by immigration in the last three decades. This book examines how Mexican immigrants who have made these towns their homes have integrated legally, culturally, and institutionally. What accounts for the massive growth in the Mexican immigrant populations in these two small towns, and what does the future hold for them? Based on 260 surveys and 47 in-depth interviews, this study combines quantitative and qualitative research to explore the level and characteristics of immigrant incorporation in Beardstown and Monmouth. It assesses the advancement of immigrants in the immigration/ residency/citizenship process, the immigrants' level of cultural integration (via language, their connectedness with other members of society, and their relationships with neighbors), the degree and characteristics of discrimination against immigrants in these two towns, and the extent to which immigrants participate in different social and political activities and trust government institutions. Immigrants in new destinations are likely to be poorer, to be less educated, and to have weaker English-language skills than immigrants in traditional destinations. Studying how this population negotiates the obstacles to and opportunities for incorporation is crucial"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F550.M5 A43 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.14321/j.ctt19x3gvw Available ocn958349771

"Beardstown and Monmouth, Illinois, two rural Midwestern towns, have been transformed by immigration in the last three decades. This book examines how Mexican immigrants who have made these towns their homes have integrated legally, culturally, and institutionally. What accounts for the massive growth in the Mexican immigrant populations in these two small towns, and what does the future hold for them? Based on 260 surveys and 47 in-depth interviews, this study combines quantitative and qualitative research to explore the level and characteristics of immigrant incorporation in Beardstown and Monmouth. It assesses the advancement of immigrants in the immigration/ residency/citizenship process, the immigrants' level of cultural integration (via language, their connectedness with other members of society, and their relationships with neighbors), the degree and characteristics of discrimination against immigrants in these two towns, and the extent to which immigrants participate in different social and political activities and trust government institutions. Immigrants in new destinations are likely to be poorer, to be less educated, and to have weaker English-language skills than immigrants in traditional destinations. Studying how this population negotiates the obstacles to and opportunities for incorporation is crucial"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 151-166) and index.

The Cases of Beardstown and Monmouth, Illinois -- Becoming Citizens? -- The Culture of Incorporation : Language Use, Identity, and Social Connectedness -- The Context of Reception : Discrimination and Acceptance -- The Politics of Incorporation : Participation -- More on Political Incorporation : Trust in Government Institutions -- Concluding Remarks -- Appendix: Survey Instrument.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book investigates Latino immigrants in Beardstown and Monmouth, Illinois. Albarracín (Western Illinois Univ.) points out that between 2000 and 2010, "the largest growth in the proportion of Latinos occurred in regions outside the West." She used oral interviews and questionnaires to gather opinions of Mexican immigrants in these rural midwestern communities, looking at political incorporation as well as legal and cultural elements. An important aspect is how the immigrants think the Anglo population views them. This is significant because much of the time, politicians focus on their views of immigrants, not how immigrants believe they are being perceived. Although outside the scope of this study, it would have been interesting to compare the opinions of the Mexican immigrants and the Anglo and African American populations in these rural towns. Many immigrants face daily discrimination by society and especially by law enforcement. This is a valuable study for those investigating American immigration in the 21st century and for historians, who can look at the results and apply the methodology to historical immigration. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Raymond Douglas Screws, Arkansas National Guard Museum

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Julia Albarracín is Dan and Laura Webb Professor of political science at Western Illinois University and received her PhD in political science from the University of Florida in 2004.

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