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Australian literature in the German Democratic Republic : reading through the Iron Curtain / edited by Nicole Moore and Christina Spittel.

Contributor(s): Moore, Nicole [editor.] | Spittel, Christina [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Anthem studies in Australian literature and culture.Publisher: London : Anthem Press, 2016Copyright date: ß2016Description: 1 online resource (xii, 261 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 178308524X; 9781783085248; 9781783085255; 1783085258.Subject(s): Australian literature -- Germany (East) | Australian literature -- History and criticism | Communism and literature -- Germany (East)Additional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 820.9/99409431 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Matter; Half Title; Series; Title; Copyright; Contents; Figures; Tables; Acknowledgments; Chapters; Introduction South by East: World Literature's Cold War Compass; Part I Contexts and Frames; Chapter 1. Censorship, Australian Literature and Foreign-Language Books in East German Publishing History; Chapter 2. Towards a Cross-Border Canon: Marcus Clarke's For the Term of His Natural Life Behind the Wall; Chapter 3. Community, Difference, Context: (Re)reading the Contact Zone; Part II Books and Writers.
Chapter 4. Sedition as Realism: Frank Hardy's Power without Glory Parts the Iron CurtainChapter 5. Katharine Susannah Prichard, Dymphna Cusack and 'Women on the Path of Progress'; Chapter 6. Walter Kaufmann: Walking the Tightrope; Chapter 7. Fictionalizing Australia for the GDR: Adventure Writer Joachim Specht; Chapter 8. 'To Do Something for Australian Literature': Anthologizing Australia for the German Democratic Republic of the 1970s; Part III Literary Exchange; Chapter 9. 'There I'm a Nobody; Here I'm a Marxian Writer': Australian Writers in the East.
Chapter 10. Behind the Wall, through Australian Eyes: Anna Funder's StasilandChapter 11. 'Because It Was Exotic, because It Was so Far Away': Bernhard Scheller in Conversation with Christina Spittel; Back Matter; Contributors; Index.
Summary: Exploring the imaginative construction of the post-colonial South by the communist East, this collaborative study of the reception of Australian literature in the German Democratic Republic has resonance for all newly global reckonings of the cultural Cold War.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR9605.3 .A87 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1ffjq4z Available ocn958455256

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Front Matter; Half Title; Series; Title; Copyright; Contents; Figures; Tables; Acknowledgments; Chapters; Introduction South by East: World Literature's Cold War Compass; Part I Contexts and Frames; Chapter 1. Censorship, Australian Literature and Foreign-Language Books in East German Publishing History; Chapter 2. Towards a Cross-Border Canon: Marcus Clarke's For the Term of His Natural Life Behind the Wall; Chapter 3. Community, Difference, Context: (Re)reading the Contact Zone; Part II Books and Writers.

Chapter 4. Sedition as Realism: Frank Hardy's Power without Glory Parts the Iron CurtainChapter 5. Katharine Susannah Prichard, Dymphna Cusack and 'Women on the Path of Progress'; Chapter 6. Walter Kaufmann: Walking the Tightrope; Chapter 7. Fictionalizing Australia for the GDR: Adventure Writer Joachim Specht; Chapter 8. 'To Do Something for Australian Literature': Anthologizing Australia for the German Democratic Republic of the 1970s; Part III Literary Exchange; Chapter 9. 'There I'm a Nobody; Here I'm a Marxian Writer': Australian Writers in the East.

Chapter 10. Behind the Wall, through Australian Eyes: Anna Funder's StasilandChapter 11. 'Because It Was Exotic, because It Was so Far Away': Bernhard Scheller in Conversation with Christina Spittel; Back Matter; Contributors; Index.

Exploring the imaginative construction of the post-colonial South by the communist East, this collaborative study of the reception of Australian literature in the German Democratic Republic has resonance for all newly global reckonings of the cultural Cold War.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Nicole Moore is a professor of English at the University of New South Wales and an Australian Research Council Future Fellow.</p> <p>Christina Spittel is a lecturer in English at the University of New South Wales.</p>

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