Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Bitter tastes : literary naturalism and early cinema in American women's writing / Donna M. Campbell.

By: Campbell, Donna M [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Athens : The University of Georgia Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (pages cm.).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780820349442; 0820349445.Subject(s): American fiction -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Motion pictures and women -- United States | Naturalism in literature | Naturalism in motion picturesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: No titleDDC classification: 813.009/9287 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Grim realism and the culture of feeling: Rebecca Harding Davis, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, and Lillie Chace Wyman -- The Darwinists: borderlands, evolution, and trauma -- Bohemian time: Glasgow, Austin, and Cather -- Red kimonos and white slavery: the fallen woman in film and print -- Where are my children? race, citizenship, and the stolen child -- "Manure widows" and middlebrow fiction: rural naturalism in the 1920s -- Waste, hoarding, and secrets: modernist naturalism and the servant's body.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS374.W6 C36 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt19x3k50 Available ocn959329203

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Grim realism and the culture of feeling: Rebecca Harding Davis, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, and Lillie Chace Wyman -- The Darwinists: borderlands, evolution, and trauma -- Bohemian time: Glasgow, Austin, and Cather -- Red kimonos and white slavery: the fallen woman in film and print -- Where are my children? race, citizenship, and the stolen child -- "Manure widows" and middlebrow fiction: rural naturalism in the 1920s -- Waste, hoarding, and secrets: modernist naturalism and the servant's body.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

As someone whose doctoral secondary specialty was American realism and naturalism, this reviewer approached Bitter Tastes with a confident complacency he now realizes was misplaced. Understanding of naturalism has often been governed more by assumption than by full comprehension. Now Campbell (Washington State Univ.) enlarges the tired definition of American naturalism beyond the label "pessimistic determinism," showing clearly how, by emphasizing "women's bodies and women's lives" and by examining the "less-than-clear-cut corners of naturalism," women writers recaptured the "vitality" submerged in the "clinical debates over heredity versus environment." Campbell's analysis of the interplay between women authors (including screenwriters) and the medium of cinema is nothing less than astounding. The author covers a broad scope, including neglected writers such as Evelyn Scott as well as famous novelists such as Edith Wharton. Yet despite the incredible range of Campbell's discussion, the book's treatment of each element is meticulous in detail and gripping in presentation. Bitter Tastes should be required reading for any serious student of naturalism, women's writing, or early film. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Lawton Andrew Brewer, Instructional Connections

Author notes provided by Syndetics

DONNA M. CAMPBELL is a professor of English at Washington State University.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.