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Branding Hoover's FBI : how the boss's PR men sold the bureau to America / Matthew Cecil.

By: Cecil, Matthew [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, 2016. 2015)Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700623068; 070062306X.Subject(s): Public relations -- United States -- History | Criminal investigation -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 363.250973/0904 Other classification: HIS036060 | POL014000 | BUS052000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: -- Preface -- Introduction: Defining a "Hoover Era" -- 1. From Corrupt to Indispensable -- 2. The Networker -- 3. Speaking with One Voice -- 4. The Editor and the Professor -- 5. Taming the Octopus -- 6. The Heir Apparent -- 7. An Empire in Decline -- 8. The Fall -- Notes -- Selected Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: "An extension of and complement to Matt Cecil's prize-winning Hoover's FBI and the Fourth Estate, this study is the first to explore the little-known lives and work of the FBI's Crime Records Section. For nearly 40 years under J. Edgar Hoover's heavy-handed leadership, hundreds of FBI agents and thousands of their clerks in the CRS labored to fashion and promote the Bureau's distinctive brand while avoiding any potential public relations embarrassments. Cecil takes us into their inner sanctums to reveal how this was done and what that tells us about one of our most influential and controversial institutions"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "Hunting down America's public enemies was just one of the FBI's jobs. Another--perhaps more vital and certainly more covert--was the job of promoting the importance and power of the FBI, a process that Matthew Cecil unfolds clearly for the first time in this eye-opening book. The story of the PR men who fashioned the Hoover era, Branding Hoover's FBI reveals precisely how the Bureau became a monolithic organization of thousands of agents who lived and breathed a well-crafted public relations message, image, and worldview. Accordingly, the book shows how the public was persuaded--some would say conned--into buying and even bolstering that image. Just fifteen years after a theater impresario coined the term "public relations," the FBI under J. Edgar Hoover began practicing a sophisticated version of the activity. Cecil introduces those agency PR men in Washington who put their singular talents to work by enforcing and amplifying Hoover's message. Louis B. Nichols, overseer of the Crime Records Section for more than twenty years, was a master of bend-your-ear networking. Milton A. Jones brought meticulous analysis to bear on the mission; Fern Stukenbroeker, a gift for eloquence; and Cartha "Deke" DeLoach, a singular charm and ambition. Branding Hoover's FBI examines key moments when this dedicated cadre, all working under the protective wing of Associate Director Clyde Tolson, manipulated public perceptions of the Bureau (was the Dillinger triumph really what it seemed?). In these critical moments, the book allows us to understand as never before how America came to see the FBI's law enforcement successes and overlook the dubious accomplishments, such as domestic surveillance, that truly defined the Hoover era."-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV8144.F43 C423 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1g69zvj Available ocn960036397

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Machine generated contents note: -- Preface -- Introduction: Defining a "Hoover Era" -- 1. From Corrupt to Indispensable -- 2. The Networker -- 3. Speaking with One Voice -- 4. The Editor and the Professor -- 5. Taming the Octopus -- 6. The Heir Apparent -- 7. An Empire in Decline -- 8. The Fall -- Notes -- Selected Bibliography -- Index.

"An extension of and complement to Matt Cecil's prize-winning Hoover's FBI and the Fourth Estate, this study is the first to explore the little-known lives and work of the FBI's Crime Records Section. For nearly 40 years under J. Edgar Hoover's heavy-handed leadership, hundreds of FBI agents and thousands of their clerks in the CRS labored to fashion and promote the Bureau's distinctive brand while avoiding any potential public relations embarrassments. Cecil takes us into their inner sanctums to reveal how this was done and what that tells us about one of our most influential and controversial institutions"-- Provided by publisher.

"Hunting down America's public enemies was just one of the FBI's jobs. Another--perhaps more vital and certainly more covert--was the job of promoting the importance and power of the FBI, a process that Matthew Cecil unfolds clearly for the first time in this eye-opening book. The story of the PR men who fashioned the Hoover era, Branding Hoover's FBI reveals precisely how the Bureau became a monolithic organization of thousands of agents who lived and breathed a well-crafted public relations message, image, and worldview. Accordingly, the book shows how the public was persuaded--some would say conned--into buying and even bolstering that image. Just fifteen years after a theater impresario coined the term "public relations," the FBI under J. Edgar Hoover began practicing a sophisticated version of the activity. Cecil introduces those agency PR men in Washington who put their singular talents to work by enforcing and amplifying Hoover's message. Louis B. Nichols, overseer of the Crime Records Section for more than twenty years, was a master of bend-your-ear networking. Milton A. Jones brought meticulous analysis to bear on the mission; Fern Stukenbroeker, a gift for eloquence; and Cartha "Deke" DeLoach, a singular charm and ambition. Branding Hoover's FBI examines key moments when this dedicated cadre, all working under the protective wing of Associate Director Clyde Tolson, manipulated public perceptions of the Bureau (was the Dillinger triumph really what it seemed?). In these critical moments, the book allows us to understand as never before how America came to see the FBI's law enforcement successes and overlook the dubious accomplishments, such as domestic surveillance, that truly defined the Hoover era."-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Cecil (arts and humanities dean, Minnesota State Univ., Mankato) previously authored Hoover's FBI and the Fourth Estate: The Campaign to Control the Press and the Bureau's Image (2014). Here he focuses on broader attempts at FBI image control, encompassing anyone who might tarnish the Bureau (which Hoover accurately viewed as identical with himself). As the boundaries of this book's coverage are rather amorphous (if not entirely non-existent), Cecil trods ground quite similar to his earlier volume, although there is considerably more here on the FBI's massive publicity machine's internal workings and its longtime head, Milton Jones (who stayed 30 years at his Sisyphean task, even as the obsessive/relentless Hoover constantly rebuked him for minuscule errors made by Jones's scores of subordinates). While little is substantively new here, FBI-niks will unquestionably benefit from many details, such as that ACLU head counsel Morris Ernst had a longtime role as FBI stooge/informant, that 17 agents collaborated (even compiling the index!) on Don Whitehead's 1956 The FBI Story, and that agent Fern Stukenbroeker largely ghostwrote "Hoover's" bestselling 1958 Masters of Deceit: The Story of Communism in America (while Hoover and his top FBI cronies reportedly pocketed the huge proceeds). Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Robert J. Goldstein, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

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