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Music in American crime prevention and punishment / Lily E. Hirsch.

By: Hirsch, Lily E, 1979- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (vii, 212 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 047202874X; 9780472028740.Subject(s): Music and crime | Music -- Social aspects -- United States | Music -- Psychological aspects | Performing arts -- Law and legislation -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 362.88/17 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Classical music in crime prevention -- Sound for sound : a new approach to punishment in noise abatement -- Rap lyrics as evidence -- The music made me do it : obscenity and incitement in legal valuations of music -- Music in prison -- Music as torture -- Epilogue.
Summary: Although the use of music for extramusical purposes has been a part of American culture for some time, the phenomenon remained largely unknown to the general public until revelations became widespread of startling military practices during the second Iraq War. In Music in American Crime Prevention and Punishment, Lily E. Hirsch explores the related terrain at the intersection of music and law, demonstrating the ways in which music has become a tool of law enforcement and justice through: police and community leaders' use of classical music in crime deterrence and punishment; the use of rap lyrics as prosecutorial evidence; allegations of music as incitement to violence; and the role of music in U.S. prisons and in detention centers in Guantanamo, Iraq, and Afghanistan. In the course of her study, Hirsch asks several questions: How does the law treat music? When and why does music participate in the law? How does music influence the legal process? How does the legal process influence music? And how do these appropriations affect the Romantic ideals underlying our view of music?
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML3917.U5 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3998/mpub.4365408 Available ocn961673574

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Classical music in crime prevention -- Sound for sound : a new approach to punishment in noise abatement -- Rap lyrics as evidence -- The music made me do it : obscenity and incitement in legal valuations of music -- Music in prison -- Music as torture -- Epilogue.

Although the use of music for extramusical purposes has been a part of American culture for some time, the phenomenon remained largely unknown to the general public until revelations became widespread of startling military practices during the second Iraq War. In Music in American Crime Prevention and Punishment, Lily E. Hirsch explores the related terrain at the intersection of music and law, demonstrating the ways in which music has become a tool of law enforcement and justice through: police and community leaders' use of classical music in crime deterrence and punishment; the use of rap lyrics as prosecutorial evidence; allegations of music as incitement to violence; and the role of music in U.S. prisons and in detention centers in Guantanamo, Iraq, and Afghanistan. In the course of her study, Hirsch asks several questions: How does the law treat music? When and why does music participate in the law? How does music influence the legal process? How does the legal process influence music? And how do these appropriations affect the Romantic ideals underlying our view of music?

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Asking fascinating questions about the use of music in law enforcement--including incarceration, detention, punishment, and torture--Hirsch (previously, Cleveland State Univ.) provides a useful study of the importance of music not only in the legal system but also in society as a whole. In a nutshell, this is a "survey [of] the use of music in escalating stages of the criminal-legal process." The book will serve as a springboard for discussing the uses of classical music in the legal system, the use of "crime inspiring" to describe rap, and the disturbing uses of music as torture and punishment. Examples from lawsuits, actions for noise abatement, and military training, among other things, are helpful in illustrating uses of music. The author places issues and problems in context in a way that readers with and without musical background can understand. Particularly valuable to those interested in the sociology of music and the ethics of using music in certain places and spaces and under certain conditions, this book can serve as a follow-up to Tia DeNora's Music in Everyday Life (2000), which is a broader study of the uses of music. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals. M. Goldsmith Louisiana State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Lily E. Hirsch is an independent scholar. Previously, she was Assistant Professor of Music and Director of the Bachelor of Arts program in music at Cleveland State University. She is the author of A Jewish Orchestra in Nazi Germany: Musical Politics and the Berlin Jewish Culture League (University of Michigan Press, 2010).</p>

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