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The Supreme Court on unions : why labor law is failing American workers / Julius G. Getman.

By: Getman, Julius G [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Ithaca ; London : ILR Press, an imprint of Cornell University Press, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (xi, 227 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781501703652; 150170365X.Subject(s): Labor unions -- Law and legislation -- United States -- Cases | Labor laws and legislation -- United States -- Cases | Labor laws and legislation -- United States -- Interpretation and constructionAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Supreme Court on unions.DDC classification: 344.7301/88 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Court and union organizing -- The Supreme Court and collective bargaining -- The Supreme Court and the right to strike -- The Court and the protected status of economic pressure -- The Supreme Court, union picketing, and boycotts -- Exclusivity and the duty of fair representation -- The Court and the definition of "employee" under the NLRA -- The Supreme Court and arbitration.
Summary: Labor unions and courts have rarely been allies. From their earliest efforts to organize, unions have been confronted with hostile judges and anti-union doctrines. In this book, Julius G. Getman argues that while the role of the Supreme Court has become more central in shaping labor law, its opinions betray a profound ignorance of labor relations along with a persisting bias against unions. In The Supreme Court on Unions, Getman critically examines the decisions of the nation's highest court in those areas that are crucial to unions and the workers they represent: organizing, bargaining, strikes, and dispute resolution. As he discusses Supreme Court decisions dealing with unions and labor in a variety of different areas, Getman offers an interesting historical perspective to illuminate the ways in which the Court has been an influence in the failures of the labor movement. During more than sixty years that have seen the Supreme Court take a dominant role, both unions and the institution of collective bargaining have been substantially weakened. While it is difficult to measure the extent of the Court's responsibility for the current weak state of organized labor, and many other factors have, of course, contributed, it seems clear to Getman that the Supreme Court has played an important role in transforming the law and defeating policies that support the labor movement. -- from dust jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF3389 .G48 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt1h4mh9k Available ocn961912774

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The Court and union organizing -- The Supreme Court and collective bargaining -- The Supreme Court and the right to strike -- The Court and the protected status of economic pressure -- The Supreme Court, union picketing, and boycotts -- Exclusivity and the duty of fair representation -- The Court and the definition of "employee" under the NLRA -- The Supreme Court and arbitration.

Labor unions and courts have rarely been allies. From their earliest efforts to organize, unions have been confronted with hostile judges and anti-union doctrines. In this book, Julius G. Getman argues that while the role of the Supreme Court has become more central in shaping labor law, its opinions betray a profound ignorance of labor relations along with a persisting bias against unions. In The Supreme Court on Unions, Getman critically examines the decisions of the nation's highest court in those areas that are crucial to unions and the workers they represent: organizing, bargaining, strikes, and dispute resolution. As he discusses Supreme Court decisions dealing with unions and labor in a variety of different areas, Getman offers an interesting historical perspective to illuminate the ways in which the Court has been an influence in the failures of the labor movement. During more than sixty years that have seen the Supreme Court take a dominant role, both unions and the institution of collective bargaining have been substantially weakened. While it is difficult to measure the extent of the Court's responsibility for the current weak state of organized labor, and many other factors have, of course, contributed, it seems clear to Getman that the Supreme Court has played an important role in transforming the law and defeating policies that support the labor movement. -- from dust jacket.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Julius G. Getman is Earl E. Sheffield Regents Chair in Law Emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin School of Law. He is the author of several books, including The Betrayal of Local 14: Paperworkers, Politics and Permanent Replacements , also from Cornell.</p>

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