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On Roman religion : lived religion and the individual in ancient Rome / Jörg Rüpke.

By: Rüpke, Jörg [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Cornell studies in classical philologyTownsend lectures: Publisher: London : Cornell University Press, 2016. 2015)Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781501706264; 1501706268.Subject(s): Experience (Religion) -- History | Religion -- Social aspects -- RomeAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 292.07 LOC classification: BL803 | .R84 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Individual appropriation of religion -- Individual decision and differences of social order in late republican Roman priesthoods -- Appropriating images embodying gods -- Testing the limits of ritual choices -- Reconstructing religious experience -- Dynamics of individual appropriation -- Religious communication -- Instructing literary practice in the Shepherd of Hermas.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
BL803 .R84 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt1d2dn8b Available ocn962439595

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Individual appropriation of religion -- Individual decision and differences of social order in late republican Roman priesthoods -- Appropriating images embodying gods -- Testing the limits of ritual choices -- Reconstructing religious experience -- Dynamics of individual appropriation -- Religious communication -- Instructing literary practice in the Shepherd of Hermas.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Ancient Roman religion has been caricatured as a collectivist religion consisting of public, polytheistic cults with little individualization. Modern Western religion is stereotyped as the antithesis of this ancient model because of its focus on personalized religious praxis. According to Rüpke (Max Weber Center, Univ. of Erfurt, Germany), this compartmentalizing of religious experience has generally prevented scholars from exploring the extent of the role individuality played in ancient Roman religion. Drawing on the contemporary methodology of "lived religion," Rüpke examines a variety of texts, practices, and religious artifacts to discover how Romans individualized their religion. He persuasively demonstrates that religious individuality can be seen in domestic cults, public sanctuaries, and personal visionary experiences. Romans reinterpreted individual priestly roles and reimagined the image of the gods. Lived religion is also evidenced in the individual appropriation of magic, in the manner in which ancient readers responded to religious texts, and in the individual invention of ritual. Religious individuality allowed ancient Romans to exploit multiple means of religious communication through available cultic infrastructure and to reflect on the options available in religious praxis. This is a groundbreaking study by a leading historian of Roman religion. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Jeffrey R. Asher, Georgetown College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Jörg Rüpke is Permanent Fellow in Religious Studies at the Max Weber Center, University of Erfurt. He is the author of many books, including From Jupiter to Christ: On the History of Religion in the Roman Imperial Period , Religion: Antiquity and Modern Legacy , and Religion in Republican Rome: Rationalization and Ritual Change .</p>

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