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Empowerment of North American Indian girls : ritual expressions at puberty / Carol A. Markstrom.

By: Markstrom, Carol A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xvii, 425 pages, [9] pages of plates) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803216211; 0803216211.Subject(s): Indians of North America -- Social life and customs | Indian girls -- United States -- Social life and customs | Puberty rites -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Empowerment of North American Indian girls.DDC classification: 973.04/97 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contextual and methodological considerations -- Contemporary youth concerns in historical perspective -- North American Indian perspectives on human development -- Menstruation, cosmology, and feminism -- Historical overview of coming-of-age practices -- The Apache Sunrise Dance -- Interpretation of the Apache Sunrise Dance -- Contemporary Navajo, Lakota, and Ojibwa puberty customs -- Broader perspectives on coming-of-age.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: Empowerment of North American Indian Girls is an examination of coming-of-age-ceremonies for American Indian girls past and present, featuring an in-depth look at Native ideas about human development and puberty. Many North American Indian cultures regard the transition from childhood to adulthood as a pivotal and potentially vulnerable phase of life and have accordingly devised coming-of-age rituals to affirm traditional values and community support for its members. Such rituals are a positive and enabling social force in many modern Native communities whose younger generations are wrestling with substance abuse, mental health problems, suicide, and school dropout.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E98.S7 M24 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1dfnv6w Available ocn213060023

Includes bibliographical references (pages 367-397) and index.

Contextual and methodological considerations -- Contemporary youth concerns in historical perspective -- North American Indian perspectives on human development -- Menstruation, cosmology, and feminism -- Historical overview of coming-of-age practices -- The Apache Sunrise Dance -- Interpretation of the Apache Sunrise Dance -- Contemporary Navajo, Lakota, and Ojibwa puberty customs -- Broader perspectives on coming-of-age.

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Empowerment of North American Indian Girls is an examination of coming-of-age-ceremonies for American Indian girls past and present, featuring an in-depth look at Native ideas about human development and puberty. Many North American Indian cultures regard the transition from childhood to adulthood as a pivotal and potentially vulnerable phase of life and have accordingly devised coming-of-age rituals to affirm traditional values and community support for its members. Such rituals are a positive and enabling social force in many modern Native communities whose younger generations are wrestling with substance abuse, mental health problems, suicide, and school dropout.

Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010.

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Markstrom's study of the puberty and coming-of-age rituals of American Indian girls explores the rites surrounding menarche in four tribes. While the book provides a useful overview of the various rituals of tribal groups throughout North America, Markstrom (human resources and education, West Virginia Univ.) spends significant time detailing the ceremonies of the Apache, Navajo, Lakota, and Ojibwa. Reserving the most thorough account of ceremony and ritual for the Apache, the author details the planning, preparation, and performance of the Apache Sunrise Dance, then analyzes and interprets the ceremony in its historical and contemporary context. Markstrom argues that menarche rituals are less about fertility than about "the value of life ... not only ... as an ongoing state of existence, but the quality of life as well," and details how these rituals place the initiate in a position of new responsibility, both personally and within the group. Particularly useful is chapter 2, in which the author contextualizes coming-of-age rituals in the wider history of colonization. Overall, despite some slight repetition, this is a very readable study of ritual in modern tribal life. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. B. Edwards University of Montana

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Carol A. Markstrom is a professor in the Department of Technology, Learning, and Culture in the College of Human Resources and Education at West Virginia University. She is the coauthor of The Adolescent Experience , fourth edition, and Adolescent Life Experiences , third edition, and has authored numerous scholarly works on adolescents and American Indians.

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