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Drawing the Line : the Father Reimagined in Faulkner, Wright, O'Connor, and Morrison / Doreen Fowler.

By: Fowler, Doreen.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813934006; 0813934001.Subject(s): Fatherhood in literature | American literature -- Southern States -- History and criticism | Identity (Philosophical concept) in literature | Patriarchy in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Drawing the Line.DDC classification: 813/.50935251 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Uncanny boundaries -- Beyond Oedipus: William Faulkner's Intruder in the dust -- Crossing a racial border: Richard Wright's Native son -- Flannery O'Connor's Prophets -- "Nobody could make it alone": Fathers and boundaries in Toni Morrison's Beloved -- Cross-racial identification in blackface minstrelsy and Black like me -- Conclusion: Bridging difference.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS228.F38 F69 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt6wrj42 Available ocn842262457

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Uncanny boundaries -- Beyond Oedipus: William Faulkner's Intruder in the dust -- Crossing a racial border: Richard Wright's Native son -- Flannery O'Connor's Prophets -- "Nobody could make it alone": Fathers and boundaries in Toni Morrison's Beloved -- Cross-racial identification in blackface minstrelsy and Black like me -- Conclusion: Bridging difference.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Fowler (Univ. of Kansas) explores the role of the father figure in writing by four American authors. In her analysis of these works, the author not only crosses the "boundaries" of critical theories, focusing primarily on psychoanalysis and feminism, but also discusses ways that father figures themselves create "boundaries" that act as both links and borders. She first considers William Faulkner's novel Intruder in the Dust, covering the double meanings found in the plot and in the relationship between a young white boy and an elderly "black" man. Next, she argues that Bigger Thomas's fathering by his lawyer Max in Richard Wright's Native Son transcends racism. The violent acts in several of Flannery O'Connor's works become the central conflict of her analysis of O'Connor's stories. Finally, her chapter on Toni Morrison's Beloved argues that the father aids in creating limitations that "both distinguish an autonomous subject and allow for alliances." Integrating existing criticism and her own ideas, Fowler makes an original contribution to the ongoing conversation about a group of authors who have already been widely examined. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. T. L. Stowell Adrian College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Doreen Fowler, Professor of English at the University of Kansas, is the author of Faulkner: The Return of the Repressed (Virginia) and the coeditor of eleven volumes of the proceedings of the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference in Oxford, Mississippi.</p>

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