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Foundation of Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials : Demonstrating and Recognizing Knowledge and Competencies

By: Ifenthaler, Dirk.
Contributor(s): Bellin-Mularski, Nicole | Mah, Dana-Kristin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2016Description: 1 online resource (540 p.).ISBN: 9783319154251.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Foundation of Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials : Demonstrating and Recognizing Knowledge and CompetenciesDDC classification: 370 LOC classification: L1-991Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface -- Contents -- About the Editors and Contributors -- Part I: Theoretical Foundation of Digital Badges -- Chapter 1: Digital Badges and Micro-credentials: Historical Overview, Motivational Aspects, Issues, and Challenges -- 1 Evolution of Symbols -- 1.1 Original Purposes -- 1.2 Development of Human Theories That Explain Badging -- 2 Historical Usage -- 2.1 Industry -- 2.2 Business -- 2.3 Sports -- 2.4 Education -- 2.5 Entertainment -- 2.6 Group Programs -- 3 Digital Badging in a Changing World -- 3.1 Technology -- 3.2 Globalization -- 3.3 Mobility -- 3.4 Evolving Needs and Technology
3.5 Problems -- 4 New Considerations of Badging -- 4.1 New Items -- 4.2 New Programs -- 4.3 Failed Programs -- 4.4 Low Impact Programs -- 4.5 Cultural Driven Foreign Programs -- 5 Digital Badging Today -- 5.1 Discussion on Current Digital Badging Program -- 5.2 The Future of Badging -- References -- Chapter 2: A Philosophy of Open Digital Badges -- 1 An Epistemology of Badges: Philosophy and Evidence -- 2 (Re)Framing an Ecosystem: Challenging Motivation -- 2.1 Mapping Knowledge Through Badges: Beyond Motivation -- 2.2 The Educational Enterprise and Communities of Learners: Badges as Business
2.3 Badging Technology and Badging Culture -- 3 Epistemology: Some Badging Narratives -- 3.1 Badges, Democracy, and Plato: Connecting Ancient Education with Modern Practice -- 3.2 Bridging Plato and Modern Education: Badges as Conversation -- 3.3 Digital Badges and Postmodern Credentialing System(s) -- 4 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 3: Keep Calm and Credential on: Linking Learning, Life and Work Practices in a Complex World -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Micro-credentials in Higher Education -- 1.2 Credentialing Professionals -- 1.3 What Is Practice? Linking Preparation and Practice
2 Higher Education as Way of Knowing, Being and Doing -- 2.1 Ontology of Higher Education -- 2.2 Epistemologies of Practice -- 3 Strategies for Integrating Micro-credentials -- 3.1 Knowledge Synthesis, Analysis and Interpretation -- 3.2 Professional Development -- 3.3 Up-Skilling or Re-skilling -- 4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 4: Drivers, Affordances and Challenges of Digital Badges -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Drivers -- 3 Affordances and Usability -- 4 Challenges -- 5 Current Practices -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5: Evaluating the Public Promise
1 Promises and Return on Expectations -- 1.1 Implicit Expectations -- 1.2 Explicit Expectations -- 2 Stakeholders and Expectations -- 3 The Measures and Their Sources -- 3.1 Big Data and Public Data -- 3.2 Internal Data -- 3.3 Generating Specific Data Sets -- 4 Sense-Making: Turning Data into Value -- 4.1 Content Analysis -- 4.2 Comparison Analysis -- 4.3 Trending -- 5 Expressing the Promise: Publishing the Story -- 5.1 Plan to Validate the Promise at Regular Intervals -- 5.2 Reporting -- 5.3 Publishing Strategy -- 5.4 Case Study: The Public Promise for Instructional Designers -- 6 Conclusion
References
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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L1-991 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=4573580 Available EBL4573580

Preface -- Contents -- About the Editors and Contributors -- Part I: Theoretical Foundation of Digital Badges -- Chapter 1: Digital Badges and Micro-credentials: Historical Overview, Motivational Aspects, Issues, and Challenges -- 1 Evolution of Symbols -- 1.1 Original Purposes -- 1.2 Development of Human Theories That Explain Badging -- 2 Historical Usage -- 2.1 Industry -- 2.2 Business -- 2.3 Sports -- 2.4 Education -- 2.5 Entertainment -- 2.6 Group Programs -- 3 Digital Badging in a Changing World -- 3.1 Technology -- 3.2 Globalization -- 3.3 Mobility -- 3.4 Evolving Needs and Technology

3.5 Problems -- 4 New Considerations of Badging -- 4.1 New Items -- 4.2 New Programs -- 4.3 Failed Programs -- 4.4 Low Impact Programs -- 4.5 Cultural Driven Foreign Programs -- 5 Digital Badging Today -- 5.1 Discussion on Current Digital Badging Program -- 5.2 The Future of Badging -- References -- Chapter 2: A Philosophy of Open Digital Badges -- 1 An Epistemology of Badges: Philosophy and Evidence -- 2 (Re)Framing an Ecosystem: Challenging Motivation -- 2.1 Mapping Knowledge Through Badges: Beyond Motivation -- 2.2 The Educational Enterprise and Communities of Learners: Badges as Business

2.3 Badging Technology and Badging Culture -- 3 Epistemology: Some Badging Narratives -- 3.1 Badges, Democracy, and Plato: Connecting Ancient Education with Modern Practice -- 3.2 Bridging Plato and Modern Education: Badges as Conversation -- 3.3 Digital Badges and Postmodern Credentialing System(s) -- 4 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 3: Keep Calm and Credential on: Linking Learning, Life and Work Practices in a Complex World -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Micro-credentials in Higher Education -- 1.2 Credentialing Professionals -- 1.3 What Is Practice? Linking Preparation and Practice

2 Higher Education as Way of Knowing, Being and Doing -- 2.1 Ontology of Higher Education -- 2.2 Epistemologies of Practice -- 3 Strategies for Integrating Micro-credentials -- 3.1 Knowledge Synthesis, Analysis and Interpretation -- 3.2 Professional Development -- 3.3 Up-Skilling or Re-skilling -- 4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 4: Drivers, Affordances and Challenges of Digital Badges -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Drivers -- 3 Affordances and Usability -- 4 Challenges -- 5 Current Practices -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5: Evaluating the Public Promise

1 Promises and Return on Expectations -- 1.1 Implicit Expectations -- 1.2 Explicit Expectations -- 2 Stakeholders and Expectations -- 3 The Measures and Their Sources -- 3.1 Big Data and Public Data -- 3.2 Internal Data -- 3.3 Generating Specific Data Sets -- 4 Sense-Making: Turning Data into Value -- 4.1 Content Analysis -- 4.2 Comparison Analysis -- 4.3 Trending -- 5 Expressing the Promise: Publishing the Story -- 5.1 Plan to Validate the Promise at Regular Intervals -- 5.2 Reporting -- 5.3 Publishing Strategy -- 5.4 Case Study: The Public Promise for Instructional Designers -- 6 Conclusion

References

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

His previous roles include Professor and Director, Centre for Research in Digital Learning at Deakin University, Australia, Manager of Applied Research and Learning Analytics at Open Universities Australia, Professor for Education and Interim Department Chair at the University of Mannheim, Germany, as well as Associate Professor for Instructional Design at the University of Freiburg, Germany. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Springer journal Technology, Knowledge and Learning and a member of the Editorial Board for Educational Technology Research and Development. Dirk is the 2013-2014 President for the AECT Design and Development Division, 2013-2015 Chair for the AERA Special Interest Group Technology, Instruction, Cognition and Learning and Co-Program Chair for the international conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA). Nicole Bellin Mularski is a research assistant at the Department of Applied Teaching and Learning Research at the University of Potsdam, Germany. She received her M.A. and Phd from Freie Universität Berlin, Germany and eventually worked as a research assistant in the fields of curriculum development, at the Technische University of Dresden and school development of full-day schools, and SES and migration related achievement disparities in elementary education at the Department of Empirical Education at the Freie Universität Berlin. She received her M.A. in Educational Science from the Berlin Institute of Technology, Germany, including a semester at Stockholm University, Sweden. She worked as research assistant in the fields of higher education, analysing doctoral candidates' supervision and students' satisfaction within their university.

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