History of wolves : a novel / Emily Fridlund.

By: Fridlund, Emily [author.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Atlantic Monthly Press, 2017Edition: First editionDescription: 279 pages ; 22 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780802125873 :Subject(s): Teenage girls -- Fiction | Belonging (Social psychology) -- Fiction | Choice (Psychology) -- Fiction | Secrecy -- Fiction | Christian Scientists -- Fiction | Minnesota -- FictionGenre/Form: Psychological fiction.Additional physical formats: Online version:: History of wolvesDDC classification: 813/.6 LOC classification: PS3606.R536 | H57 2016Other classification: FIC019000 Summary: ""So delicately calibrated and precisely beautiful that one might not immediately sense the sledgehammer of pain building inside this book. And I mean that in the best way. What powerful tension and depth this provides!"-Aimee Bender. Fourteen-year-old Linda lives with her parents in the beautiful, austere woods of northern Minnesota, where their nearly abandoned commune stands as a last vestige of a lost counter-culture world. Isolated at home and an outlander at school, Linda is drawn to the enigmatic, attractive Lily and new history teacher Mr. Grierson. When Mr. Grierson is charged with possessing child pornography, the implications of his arrest deeply affect Linda as she wrestles with her own fledgling desires and craving to belong. And then the young Gardner family moves in across the lake and Linda finds herself welcomed into their home as a babysitter for their little boy, Paul. It seems that her life finally has purpose but with this new sense of belonging she is also drawn into secrets she doesn't understand. Over the course of a few days, Linda makes a set of choices that reverberate throughout her life. As she struggles to find a way out of the sequestered world into which she was born, Linda confronts the life-and-death consequences of the things people do-and fail to do-for the people they love. Winner of the McGinnis-Ritchie award for its first chapter, Emily Fridlund's propulsive and gorgeously written History of Wolves introduces a new writer of enormous range and talent"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Bestseller University of Texas At Tyler
Bestseller Collection - 2nd Floor
PS 3606 .R536 H57 2016 (Browse shelf) Available 1000000003995

Booklist, October 15, 2016

Kirkus Reviews, October 15, 2016

Publishers Weekly, October 03, 2016

BookPage, January 01, 2017

""So delicately calibrated and precisely beautiful that one might not immediately sense the sledgehammer of pain building inside this book. And I mean that in the best way. What powerful tension and depth this provides!"-Aimee Bender. Fourteen-year-old Linda lives with her parents in the beautiful, austere woods of northern Minnesota, where their nearly abandoned commune stands as a last vestige of a lost counter-culture world. Isolated at home and an outlander at school, Linda is drawn to the enigmatic, attractive Lily and new history teacher Mr. Grierson. When Mr. Grierson is charged with possessing child pornography, the implications of his arrest deeply affect Linda as she wrestles with her own fledgling desires and craving to belong. And then the young Gardner family moves in across the lake and Linda finds herself welcomed into their home as a babysitter for their little boy, Paul. It seems that her life finally has purpose but with this new sense of belonging she is also drawn into secrets she doesn't understand. Over the course of a few days, Linda makes a set of choices that reverberate throughout her life. As she struggles to find a way out of the sequestered world into which she was born, Linda confronts the life-and-death consequences of the things people do-and fail to do-for the people they love. Winner of the McGinnis-Ritchie award for its first chapter, Emily Fridlund's propulsive and gorgeously written History of Wolves introduces a new writer of enormous range and talent"-- Provided by publisher.

Adult. Brodart

Adult. Brodart

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

When scandal shakes Madeline's small town, she is left feeling betrayed by her favorite teacher Mr. Grierson. Despite her curiosity about the stories flying around regarding Mr. Grierson and a classmate, Madeline tries to find ways to distract herself. She decides that the family who just moved in next door is enough to interest her and soon has a job as the babysitter, or governess as they like to say, for their four-year-old son, Paul. As time goes on, Madeline feels increasingly uneasy with the family and the situation, and her hunch proves right, as everything changes when a tragedy occurs. Susan Bennett's narration is downright creepy, as her voice captures the foreboding of the story. There is not much distinction among characters, but there is just enough variation that the narration is easy to follow. It is uncomfortable to listen to at times, but that seems to have been the author's intention. Verdict This will appeal to those who enjoy dark stories, and while some sections are slow, it will interest those who pick up on small details and like to solve mysteries.-Emma Manfred, Glastonbury, CT © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Winter falls hard in northern Minnesota. So 14-year-old Linda watches with interest when, months before the thaw, a young mother and her son return alone to their summer house across the lake. Linda is drawn into their lives when the mother, Patra, asks her to watch four-year-old Paul while Patra edits manuscripts. Linda is deeply affected by the intensity of Patra's care for Paul, so different from the nonchalance of her own mother. The teen is an untamed storyteller, and her past and present swing about as she interrupts one plot thread in pursuit of another, as if the emotional connections among events supersede chronology. A succession of days spent with Patra and Paul veer into a deluge of memories from Linda's childhood in a commune or recollections of her former history teacher, who may have molested a classmate. Fridlund's crystalline descriptions keep the narrative focused, but nearly everything else in the book, including Linda's true name, is subject to interpretation. The author foreshadows tragedy, which arrives with the unimaginable brutality of a Minnesotan blizzard. VERDICT Teens who appreciated the natural settings and poetic writing of Ron Rash's The World Made Straight and The Cove or the stylistic complexity of Louise Erdrich's The Round House will love this one. This strikingly original tale, so rooted in its natural setting, will captivate readers with a penchant for powerful, unorthodox prose.-Diane Colson, Librarian, City -College, Gainesville, FL © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Emily Fridlund grew up in Minnesota and currently resides in the Finger Lakes region of New York. Her fiction has appeared in a variety of journals, including Boston Review, Zyzzyva, Five Chapters, New Orleans Review, Sou'wester, New Delta Review, Chariton Review, The Portland Review, and Painted Bride Quarterly. She holds a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Southern California. Fridlund's collection of stories, Catapult , was a finalist for the Noemi Book Award for Fiction and the Tartts First Fiction Award. It won the Mary McCarthy Prize and will be published by Sarabande in 2017. The opening chapter of History of Wolves was published in Southwest Review and won the 2013 McGinnis-Ritchie Award for Fiction.

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