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Proposing prosperity? : marriage education policy and inequality in America / Jennifer M. Randles.

By: Randles, Jennifer M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (224 p.).ISBN: 9780231543170; 0231543174.Subject(s): Family life education -- United States | Marriage -- United States | Family policy -- United States | Poor families -- Services for -- United States | Equality -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Proposing Prosperity? : Marriage Education Policy and Inequality in AmericaDDC classification: 372.37/40973 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Title Page; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction: Learning and Legislating Love; 2. Rationalizing Romance: Reconciling the Modern Marriage Dilemma through Skilled Love; 3. Teaching Upward Mobility: Skilled Love and the Marriage Gap; 4. Intimate Inequalities and Curtailed Commitments: The Marriage Gap in a Middle-Class Marriage Culture; 5. The Missing "M Word": Promoting Committed Co-Parenting; 6. Men, Money, and Marriageability: Promoting Responsible Fatherhood through Marital Masculinity; 7. "It's Not Just Us": Relationship Skills and Poverty's Perpetual Problems
8. Conclusion: Family Inequality and the Limits of SkillsNotes; References; Index
Summary: #x93;Fragile families"#x97;unmarried parents who struggle emotionally and financially#x97;are one of the primary targets of the Healthy Marriage Initiative, a federal policy that has funded marriage education programs in nearly every state. These programs, which encourage marriage by teaching relationship skills, are predicated on the hope that married couples can provide a more emotionally and financially stable home for their children. Healthy marriage policy promotes a pro-marriage culture in which two-parent married families are considered the healthiest. It also assumes that marriage can be a socioec.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ10.5.U6R36 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/rand17030 Available ocn965772995

Description based upon print version of record.

Title Page; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction: Learning and Legislating Love; 2. Rationalizing Romance: Reconciling the Modern Marriage Dilemma through Skilled Love; 3. Teaching Upward Mobility: Skilled Love and the Marriage Gap; 4. Intimate Inequalities and Curtailed Commitments: The Marriage Gap in a Middle-Class Marriage Culture; 5. The Missing "M Word": Promoting Committed Co-Parenting; 6. Men, Money, and Marriageability: Promoting Responsible Fatherhood through Marital Masculinity; 7. "It's Not Just Us": Relationship Skills and Poverty's Perpetual Problems

8. Conclusion: Family Inequality and the Limits of SkillsNotes; References; Index

#x93;Fragile families"#x97;unmarried parents who struggle emotionally and financially#x97;are one of the primary targets of the Healthy Marriage Initiative, a federal policy that has funded marriage education programs in nearly every state. These programs, which encourage marriage by teaching relationship skills, are predicated on the hope that married couples can provide a more emotionally and financially stable home for their children. Healthy marriage policy promotes a pro-marriage culture in which two-parent married families are considered the healthiest. It also assumes that marriage can be a socioec.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book has important ethnographical value. It offers detailed observations of the actual workings of marriage and relationship education programs funded by government in the wake of welfare reform. This effort is a response to the mountain of data showing that married two-parent families, including especially their children, generally achieve better outcomes in all aspects of life compared to adults and children in broken-home and single-parent situations. Marriage brings substantial benefits. Randles (California State Univ.) acknowledges this evidence and shows some sympathy for the efforts of marriage programs to help lower-income couples, in particular, develop the personal skills to achieve healthier relationships necessary for successful marriage. Nevertheless, for ideological reasons, the author disparages the programs as "neoliberal" and promoting the "culture of poverty" viewpoint. She downplays the agency of the people participating--their ability to make choices and adopt values that can improve their lives. Instead, she emphasizes how "inequality" and "socioeconomic conditions" largely determine their behavior and fate. While awaiting the transformation of these conditions, the author's ideal for marriage and relationship education would amount to offering participants sociological lectures explaining the inequities of US society. Would anyone attend? Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. --Jack Stauder, University of Massachusetts--Dartmouth

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jennifer M. Randles is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at California State University, Fresno. Her research explores how inequalities affect American family life and how policies address family formation trends.

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