Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The great Gatsby / F. Scott Fitzgerald ; preface by Matthew J. Bruccoli.

By: Fitzgerald, F. Scott (Francis Scott), 1896-1940.
Contributor(s): Bruccoli, Matthew J. (Matthew Joseph), 1931-2008.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Scribner classics: Publisher: New York : Scribner, [1996]Description: 170 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0684830426 (alk. paper); 9780684830421 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Long Island (N.Y.) -- Fiction | Traffic accidents -- Fiction | First loves -- Fiction | Rich people -- Fiction | Mistresses -- Fiction | Revenge -- FictionGenre/Form: Psychological fiction.DDC classification: 813/.52 Summary: Jay Gatsby had once loved beautiful, spoiled Daisy Buchanan, then lost her to a rich boy. Now, mysteriously wealthy, he is ready to risk everything to woo her back. Bathtub gin, flappers and house parties that last all week enliven Fitzgerald's classic tale, a startling portrait of Gatsby's search for meaning in his opulent world.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3511.I9 G7 1996 (Browse shelf) Checked out 03/07/2018

Jay Gatsby had once loved beautiful, spoiled Daisy Buchanan, then lost her to a rich boy. Now, mysteriously wealthy, he is ready to risk everything to woo her back. Bathtub gin, flappers and house parties that last all week enliven Fitzgerald's classic tale, a startling portrait of Gatsby's search for meaning in his opulent world.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Canadian actor William Hope reads Naxos AudioBooks' first unabridged production of Fitzgerald's classic novel of the Roaring Twenties. It is a book that deserves a perfect reading, and though numerous other narrators have tried-among them Robertson Dean, Anthony Heald, Alexander Scourby, and Tim Robbins-Hope may have come closest to achieving this perfection. He stumbles a bit at the beginning, drawing upon the revelation that narrator Nick Carraway is a Yale man by making the narration somewhat arch, but once he settles down, Hope ably conveys Carraway's optimistic innocence. He also does quite well with the party guests and the gambler Meyer Wolfsheim, faltering only by making Tom Buchanan sound a bit like a gravel-voiced truck driver. Recommended for absolutely everyone, as even those familiar with the novel may notice something new thanks to Hope's nuanced (and only mildly faulty) performance. [Gatz, a live ensemble reading of this classic novel, is currently playing to great reviews.-Ed.]-Michael Adams, CUNY Graduate Ctr. Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up‘An initial biographical essay and closing chronology introduce Fitzgerald, his era, and his place in American literature. "For Further Research" includes Web site sources and provides helpful primary and secondary references. Spanning more than 50 years of criticism, the 19 pithy essays, one by Fitzgerald himself, are divided into three chapters that successively focus on Gatsby's character, American culture, and literary structure. Additional quotes, boxed and placed throughout the text, provide additional support for the authors' positions. There is little overlap of other Fitzgerald or Gatsby volumes in similar series, and although comparable titles written by one author exist, this volume's multi-authored critiques afford a highly varied, even conflicting, dialogue that's necessary for stimulating classroom discussion.‘Kate Foldy, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This fine critical edition of The Great Gatsby is a desirable acquisition for all university libraries and will prove quite useful to both scholars and college students. Editor Bruccoli, a preeminent Fitzgerald scholar, has made numerous appropriate changes in the original text, many of them desired by Fitzgerald but overlooked in the haste with which the 1925 edition was rushed into print. The scholarly apparatus is accessible and often fascinating. Stages of composition and revision from manuscript through galleys are explained chronologically. Substantive emendations and typographical "accidentals" are catalogued. Explanatory notes are succinctly provided throughout the text. Various appendixes dealing with the novel's early titles, dust-jacket illustrations, chronology, and the geography of East and West Egg (with illustrative maps) are provided, as are facsimiles of sample manuscript and galley pages. Throughout, the editor explains and justifies the difficult decisions he has made as to what to change and what to let stand. In sum, this is a meticulous and necessary work of scholarship, a valuable addition to Fitzgerald studies and to any library.-B. H. Leeds, Central Connecticut State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

F(rancis) Scott Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on September 24, 1896. He was educated at Princeton University and served in the U.S. Army from 1917 to 1919, attaining the rank of second lieutenant. In 1920 Fitzgerald married Zelda Sayre, a young woman of the upper class, and they had a daughter, Frances.

Fitzgerald is regarded as one of the finest American writers of the 20th Century. His most notable work was the novel, The Great Gatsby (1925). The novel focused on the themes of the Roaring Twenties and of the loss of innocence and ethics among the nouveau riche. He also made many contributions to American literature in the form of short stories, plays, poetry, music, and letters. Ernest Hemingway, who was greatly influenced by Fitzgerald's short stories, wrote that Fitzgerald's talent was "as fine as the dust on a butterfly's wing." Yet during his lifetime Fitzgerald never had a bestselling novel and, toward the end of his life, he worked sporadically as a screenwriter at motion picture studios in Los Angeles. There he contributed to scripts for such popular films as Winter Carnival and Gone with the Wind.

Fitzgerald's work is inseparable from the Roaring 20s. Berenice Bobs Her Hair and A Diamond As Big As The Ritz, are two short stories included in his collections, Tales of the Jazz Age and Flappers and Philosophers. His first novel The Beautiful and Damned was flawed but set up Fitzgerald's major themes of the fleeting nature of youthfulness and innocence, unattainable love, and middle-class aspiration for wealth and respectability, derived from his own courtship of Zelda. This Side of Paradise (1920) was Fitzgerald's first unqualified success. Tender Is the Night, a mature look at the excesses of the exuberant 20s, was published in 1934.

Much of Fitzgerald's work has been adapted for film, including Tender is the Night , The Great Gatsby, and Babylon Revisited which was adapted as The Last Time I Saw Paris by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1954. The Last Tycoon, adapted by Paramount in 1976, was a work in progress when Fitzgerald died of a heart attack on December 21, 1940, in Hollywood, California. Fitzgerald is buried in the historic St. Mary's Cemetery in Rockville, Maryland.

(Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.