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The Constitution in the Supreme Court : The First Hundred Years, 1789-1888

By: Currie, David P.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (519 p.).ISBN: 9780226222424.Subject(s): Constitutional history -- United States | Constitutional law -- United States | United States. -- Supreme CourtGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Constitution in the Supreme Court : The First Hundred Years, 1789-1888DDC classification: 342.73 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Introduction -- Part One: Chief Justices Jay and Ellsworth, 1789-1801 -- Introduction to Part One -- 1. Outlines of Federal Jurisdiction -- 2. Limitations on Congressional and State Powers -- Conclusion to Part One -- Part Two: Chief Justice Marshall, 1801-1835 -- Introduction to Part Two -- 3. The Powers of the Federal Courts, 1801-1810 -- 4. Later Jurisdictional Decisions -- 5. The Contract Clause and Natural Law -- 6. Congressional Authority and Other Limits on State Power -- Conclusion to Part Two -- Part Three: Chief Justice Taney, 1836-1864 -- Introduction to Part Three
7. Contracts and Commerce -- 8. Article IV and Federal Powers -- Conclusion to Part Three -- Part Four: Chief Justice Chase, 1865-1873 -- Introduction to Part Four -- 9. Civil War and Reconstruction -- 10. Limitations on State Power -- Conclusion to Part Four -- Part Five: Chief Justice Waite, 1874-1888 -- Introduction to Part Five -- 11. The Civil War Amendments -- 12. Commerce and Sovereign Immunity -- 13. The Powers of Congress -- Conclusion to Part Five -- Epilogue -- Appendix A: Justices of the Supreme Court, 1789-1888 -- Appendix B: The Constitution of the United States -- Table of Cases
Index
Summary: Currie's masterful synthesis of legal analysis and narrative history, gives us a sophisticated and much-needed evaluation of the Supreme Court's first hundred years. ""A thorough, systematic, and careful assessment. . . . As a reference work for constitutional teachers, it is a gold mine.""-Charles A. Lofgren, Constitutional Commentary
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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KF4550 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2130129 Available EBL2130129

Contents -- Introduction -- Part One: Chief Justices Jay and Ellsworth, 1789-1801 -- Introduction to Part One -- 1. Outlines of Federal Jurisdiction -- 2. Limitations on Congressional and State Powers -- Conclusion to Part One -- Part Two: Chief Justice Marshall, 1801-1835 -- Introduction to Part Two -- 3. The Powers of the Federal Courts, 1801-1810 -- 4. Later Jurisdictional Decisions -- 5. The Contract Clause and Natural Law -- 6. Congressional Authority and Other Limits on State Power -- Conclusion to Part Two -- Part Three: Chief Justice Taney, 1836-1864 -- Introduction to Part Three

7. Contracts and Commerce -- 8. Article IV and Federal Powers -- Conclusion to Part Three -- Part Four: Chief Justice Chase, 1865-1873 -- Introduction to Part Four -- 9. Civil War and Reconstruction -- 10. Limitations on State Power -- Conclusion to Part Four -- Part Five: Chief Justice Waite, 1874-1888 -- Introduction to Part Five -- 11. The Civil War Amendments -- 12. Commerce and Sovereign Immunity -- 13. The Powers of Congress -- Conclusion to Part Five -- Epilogue -- Appendix A: Justices of the Supreme Court, 1789-1888 -- Appendix B: The Constitution of the United States -- Table of Cases

Index

Currie's masterful synthesis of legal analysis and narrative history, gives us a sophisticated and much-needed evaluation of the Supreme Court's first hundred years. ""A thorough, systematic, and careful assessment. . . . As a reference work for constitutional teachers, it is a gold mine.""-Charles A. Lofgren, Constitutional Commentary

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

One need not be a lawyer to have an interest in constitutional law. Without a law degree, however, one should obtain a careful introduction to the canons of the Supreme Court in order to refine that interest. Currie (University of Chicago) is a prominent scholar and practiced teacher who gives a very helpful exposition of the constitutional decisions of the Court during its first century. His book is not for the casual browser, but the attentive reader will find many rewards. Currie's chatty style and colorful phrases make both the well-worked familiar material and the dense or obscure ruminations of the Court sensible, orderly, and appealing. His chronological review of the decisions is punctuated by keen evaluations of the Justices and measurements of the work of one era against that of another. His objective and subjective conclusions are perceptive and notable. For the aficianado, there are extensive and richly detailed footnotes. A determined critic might find fault with Currie's resolute effort to attach significance to the work of the 18th-century Justices. Few students of the Court have considered John Marshall's predecessors worthy of the time and space that Currie gives them; most will remain unconvinced. Currie's work is a fine study; a review of the second century would complete an impressive addition to the literature. Upper-division and graduate collections.-T.P. Campbell, Jr., Northeastern University

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