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Where night is day : the world of the ICU / James Kelly.

By: Kelly, James, 1948- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Culture and politics of health care work: Publisher: Ithaca : ILR Press, an imprint of Cornell University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (xii, 231 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0801467659; 9780801467653.Subject(s): Intensive care nursing -- New Mexico | Intensive care units -- New MexicoAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Where night is dayDDC classification: 616.02/8 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The voyage into the sea of critical illness -- Diagnosis, diagnosis, diagnosis -- Nursing isn't a journey -- One more day -- The dream of cure -- Nursing : what it is and what it is not -- Caring -- Medicine as ghost rain -- Dying -- Poetic and tragic murmurings of the everyday -- They tell us everything -- Can they hear? -- Leaving ends the love -- The horizon.
Summary: "This book describes the hour-by-hour, day-by-day rhythms of an intensive care unit in a teaching hospital in New Mexico. Written by a nurse, Where Night Is Day reveals the specialized work of ICU nursing and its unique perspective on illness, suffering, and death. It takes place over a thirteen-week period, the time of the average rotation of medical residents through the ICU. As the author, James Kelly, reflects on the rise of medicine, the nature of nursing, the argument of care versus cure, he offers up an intimate portrait of the ICU, the patients who live and/or die there, and the medical professionals who work there"--Publisher's Web site.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RT120.I5 K45 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt1xx668 Available ocn834608130

"This book describes the hour-by-hour, day-by-day rhythms of an intensive care unit in a teaching hospital in New Mexico. Written by a nurse, Where Night Is Day reveals the specialized work of ICU nursing and its unique perspective on illness, suffering, and death. It takes place over a thirteen-week period, the time of the average rotation of medical residents through the ICU. As the author, James Kelly, reflects on the rise of medicine, the nature of nursing, the argument of care versus cure, he offers up an intimate portrait of the ICU, the patients who live and/or die there, and the medical professionals who work there"--Publisher's Web site.

The voyage into the sea of critical illness -- Diagnosis, diagnosis, diagnosis -- Nursing isn't a journey -- One more day -- The dream of cure -- Nursing : what it is and what it is not -- Caring -- Medicine as ghost rain -- Dying -- Poetic and tragic murmurings of the everyday -- They tell us everything -- Can they hear? -- Leaving ends the love -- The horizon.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 223-231).

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Kelly (registered nurse, Lovelace Women's Hospital, Albuquerque) draws on his experiences as an intensive-care nurse to put a human face on the decisions made by the practitioners of medicine. He writes about patients not simply as biological problems, but as complex individuals whose health and decisions are deeply shaped by their families, histories, and economic circumstances. Interspersed with these portraits are reflections on the nature of medicine, the development of medical education, and the history of health care. At times the book seems overly critical of physicians; while some may not appreciate nurses, many doctors understand what nurses do and trust their judgments and opinions. Verdict Some patient portraits are moving, while others seem overly dramatized and filled with clumsy descriptive writing. In addition, general readers may find the unexplained medical terminology a hindrance to fully understanding Kelly's message. Despite the relative scarcity of nurse's memoirs, this is an optional purchase.-Aaron Klink, Duke Univ., Durham, NC (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This book, part of "The Culture and Politics of Health Care Work" series, is a must read for all nursing and medical students. Here, critical care nurse Kelly shares his experiences in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Lovelace Women's Hospital (New Mexico) over a 13-week period. He also perfectly describes the experiences of the ICU patients and their families--what they see, do, and reflect on during this time. Lastly, he discusses his interactions with physicians, and explains how nurses and doctors collaborate to accomplish the common goals of keeping patients comfortable, sedated, and alive. Kelly successfully depicts "the good" and "the bad" of ICUs. He tells the stories of individual patients and families, and describes the ICU subculture in a graphic, realistic manner. He conveys the nurse's perspective on the grueling experience of having to make life-and-death decisions on a daily basis. He clearly shows how emotional, and sometimes unemotional, a nurse must be to survive this type of professional setting. The book includes good descriptions of the geography of New Mexico and the Native American culture. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All health sciences students, researchers/faculty, professionals, and health care consumers. S. C. Grossman Fairfield University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>James Kelly works in critical care as an RN in the ICU at Lovelace Women's Hospital in Albuquerque, New Mexico.</p>

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