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Hardhats, hippies, and hawks : the Vietnam antiwar movement as myth and memory / Penny Lewis.

By: Lewis, Penny (Penny W.).
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Ithaca : ILR Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0801467810; 9780801467813.Subject(s): Collective memory -- United States | Memory -- Social aspects -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Hardhats, hippies, and hawks.DDC classification: 959.704/31 Other classification: 15.85 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Collective memory of Vietnam antiwar sentiment and protest -- The movement's early years : fodder for the image -- Countercurrents in the movement : complicating the class base -- The "counter memory" : working class antiwar sentiment and action I : a rich man's war and a poor man's fight : labor against war -- The "counter memory" : working class antiwar sentiment and action II : resistance and dissent within the armed forces : GIs and veterans join the movement -- Anticipation of the class divide -- "Elite doves" vs. "hardhats" : consolidation of the image.
Summary: "In the popular imagination, opposition to the Vietnam War was driven largely by college students and elite intellectuals, while supposedly reactionary blue-collar workers largely supported the war effort. In Hardhats, Hippies, and Hawks, Penny Lewis challenges this collective memory of class polarization. Through close readings of archival documents, popular culture, and media accounts at the time, she offers a more accurate "counter-memory" of a diverse, cross-class opposition to the war in Southeast Asia that included the labor movement, working-class students, soldiers and veterans, and Black Power, civil rights, and Chicano activists. Lewis investigates why the image of antiwar class division gained such traction at the time and has maintained such a hold on popular memory since. Identifying the primarily middle-class culture of the early antiwar movement, she traces how the class interests of its first organizers were reflected in its subsequent forms. The founding narratives of class-based political behavior, Lewis shows, were amplified in the late 1960s and early 1970s because the working class, in particular, lacked a voice in the public sphere a problem that only increased in the subsequent period, even as working-class opposition to the war grew. By exposing as false the popular image of conservative workers and liberal elites separated by an unbridgeable gulf, Lewis suggests that shared political attitudes and actions are, in fact, possible between these two groups."--Publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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DS559.62.U6 L49 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt1xx5br Available ocn840162119
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
DS559.62.S68 -- F79 2015 American South and the Vietnam War : DS559.62.U6 Dangerous Grounds. DS559.62.U6 K33 2016 The war after the war : DS559.62.U6 L49 2013 Hardhats, hippies, and hawks : DS559.62.U6 S33 2013 The pro-war movement : DS559.63 .S68 2014 Defend and befriend : DS559.64 -- .W47 2014 Bringing God to Men :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Collective memory of Vietnam antiwar sentiment and protest -- The movement's early years : fodder for the image -- Countercurrents in the movement : complicating the class base -- The "counter memory" : working class antiwar sentiment and action I : a rich man's war and a poor man's fight : labor against war -- The "counter memory" : working class antiwar sentiment and action II : resistance and dissent within the armed forces : GIs and veterans join the movement -- Anticipation of the class divide -- "Elite doves" vs. "hardhats" : consolidation of the image.

Print version record.

"In the popular imagination, opposition to the Vietnam War was driven largely by college students and elite intellectuals, while supposedly reactionary blue-collar workers largely supported the war effort. In Hardhats, Hippies, and Hawks, Penny Lewis challenges this collective memory of class polarization. Through close readings of archival documents, popular culture, and media accounts at the time, she offers a more accurate "counter-memory" of a diverse, cross-class opposition to the war in Southeast Asia that included the labor movement, working-class students, soldiers and veterans, and Black Power, civil rights, and Chicano activists. Lewis investigates why the image of antiwar class division gained such traction at the time and has maintained such a hold on popular memory since. Identifying the primarily middle-class culture of the early antiwar movement, she traces how the class interests of its first organizers were reflected in its subsequent forms. The founding narratives of class-based political behavior, Lewis shows, were amplified in the late 1960s and early 1970s because the working class, in particular, lacked a voice in the public sphere a problem that only increased in the subsequent period, even as working-class opposition to the war grew. By exposing as false the popular image of conservative workers and liberal elites separated by an unbridgeable gulf, Lewis suggests that shared political attitudes and actions are, in fact, possible between these two groups."--Publisher's description.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Penny Lewis is Assistant Professor of Labor Studies at the Joseph P. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies, City University of New York.</p>

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