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Everyday life in the North Korean revolution, 1945-1950 / Suzy Kim.

By: Kim, Suzy, 1972- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0801469368; 9780801469367.Additional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 951.9304 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Revolutions in the everyday -- Legacies : fomenting the revolution -- Three reforms : initiating the revolution -- The collective : enacting the revolution -- Autobiographies : narrating the revolution -- Revolutionary motherhood : gendering the revolution -- "Liberated space" : remembering the revolution.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS935.55 .K567 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt32b5jt Available ocn857740103

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Revolutions in the everyday -- Legacies : fomenting the revolution -- Three reforms : initiating the revolution -- The collective : enacting the revolution -- Autobiographies : narrating the revolution -- Revolutionary motherhood : gendering the revolution -- "Liberated space" : remembering the revolution.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Kim (Rutgers) provides a view from everyday life of the construction of North Korea. Her book will be of interest to those who want something besides a state-focused treatment, and should be of particular use to readers wishing to problematize "the everyday" as a category worth exploring in its own right. Broadly chronological, Kim's work stays focused on various "everyday" people as examples of how the North Korean revolution enabled regular peasants to build a new socialist modernity uniquely theirs. The author relies on oral histories and archival sources to bring these marginalized histories to light. The one omission is the lack of bibliography, but her inclusion of "Sample Curricula for Party Members" will be useful to scholars. Kim is well read across Korean, Russian, and Chinese sources as well as scholarship on North Korea. Her innovative approach is a nice addition to works like Gi-Wook Shin and Michael Robinson's Colonial Modernity in Korea (CH, Jul'00, 37-6406), and certainly a step forward from the typical Cold War approach like Ralph Hassig and Kongdan Oh's North Korea through the Looking Glass (2000). Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers and undergraduate and graduate students and scholars. M. C. Brose University of Wyoming

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Suzy Kim is Associate Professor of Korean History at Rutgers University.</p>

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