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Tyranny of the weak : North Korea and the world, 1950-1992 / Charles K. Armstrong.

By: Armstrong, Charles K [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University: Publisher: Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (1 online resource (pages 329)).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780801468940; 0801468949.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Tyranny of the weakDDC classification: 951.9304/3 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The unfinished war, 1950-1953 -- Post-war reconstruction and a declaration of self-reliance, 1953-1955 -- A singular path : North Korea in the socialist community,1956-1963 -- The anti-imperialist front, 1963-1972 -- Breaking out : engaging the first and third worlds, 1972-1979 -- A new generation and a new cold war, 1980-1984 -- The sun sets in the east, 1985-1992 -- Epilogue : tyranny of the weak, tyranny of the strong.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS935.65 .A76 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt32b4df Available ocn858045584

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The unfinished war, 1950-1953 -- Post-war reconstruction and a declaration of self-reliance, 1953-1955 -- A singular path : North Korea in the socialist community,1956-1963 -- The anti-imperialist front, 1963-1972 -- Breaking out : engaging the first and third worlds, 1972-1979 -- A new generation and a new cold war, 1980-1984 -- The sun sets in the east, 1985-1992 -- Epilogue : tyranny of the weak, tyranny of the strong.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

If North Korea scares you (and it should), then this vivid and cogent book is for you. Armstrong (Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences, Columbia Univ.) asks how the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), poor, stagnant, and isolated, has continually been able to play international allies, patrons, and enemies against one another to get what it has wanted. Founder Kim Il-sung manipulated Stalin and Mao Zedong to start the Korean War in 1950, then extorted their help to subsidize Juche (self-reliance) and support his hopes of Third World socialist leadership. After the Soviet Union dissolved in 1989, Russia demanded that the "tail stop telling the dog what to do," as Armstrong puts it, and recognized capitalist South Korea. China was stuck with the DPRK but joined Japan and the United States in trading with prosperous South Korea. Yet famine and isolation in the DPRK led to ideological petrification and elite -self-perpetuation, not Chinese-style reform. Even so, as Armstrong points out in his epilog, Kim Jong-il, who succeeded Kim Il-sung, got what he wanted by alternating fierce negotiation and the blackmail power of his atomic bomb. Kim Jung-un, the current young leader, understands the benefits of seeming crazy but may not be in control. VERDICT Read it!-Charles Hayford, Evanston, IL (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Armstrong (Columbia Univ.) previously wrote, among other works, The Koreas (2007), Korean Society (2nd ed., 2006), and The North Korean Revolution, 1945-1950 (CH, Oct'03, 41-1077); he also coedited Korea at the Center (2006). This new volume describes the history of North Korea's government and international relations on a macroscopic and detailed level from the mid to late 20th century. In addition to an introduction and epilogue, the volume features seven chapters, ranging from "The Unfinished War, 1950-53" to "The Sun Sets in the East, 1985-92." Armstrong was able to make extensive research visits to access primary sources in Washington, DC, China, Russia, Germany, and other places. This timely, scholarly monograph elaborates on the dearth of Western research on the "Hermit Kingdom," and discusses the implications of an "unreformed" North Korea for the 21st century. Photographs are included, but maps would have enhanced readers' knowledge of the geopolitical landscape of North Korea's foreign relations. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above. S. H. Jeong Wake Forest University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Charles K. Armstrong is the Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences, Department of History, at Columbia University. He is the author of The North Korean Revolution, 1945-1950 , also from Cornell, and The Koreas , editor of Korean Society: Civil Society, Democracy and the State , and coeditor of Korea at the Center: Dynamics of Regionalism in Northeast Asia .</p>

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