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Unpopular sovereignty : Mormons and the federal management of early Utah Territory / Brent M. Rogers.

By: Rogers, Brent M [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lincoln ; London : University of Nebraska Press, [2017]Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803296442; 0803296444; 9780803296466; 0803296460.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Unpopular sovereigntyDDC classification: 979.2/02 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Imperium in imperio : sovereignty and the American territorial system -- Intimate contact : gender, plural marriage, and the U.S. Army in Utah Territory, 1854-1856 -- Missionaries to the Indians : Mormon and federal Indian policies -- Confronting the "twin relics of barbarism" : the Mormon question, the Buchanan administration, and the limits of popular sovereignty -- The Utah War and the westward march of federal sovereignty, 1857-1858 -- The U.S. Army and the symbolic conquering of Mormon sovereignty -- To 1862 : the codification of federal authority and the end of popular sovereignty in the western territories.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JK8490 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1hhfnph Available ocn945550089

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Imperium in imperio : sovereignty and the American territorial system -- Intimate contact : gender, plural marriage, and the U.S. Army in Utah Territory, 1854-1856 -- Missionaries to the Indians : Mormon and federal Indian policies -- Confronting the "twin relics of barbarism" : the Mormon question, the Buchanan administration, and the limits of popular sovereignty -- The Utah War and the westward march of federal sovereignty, 1857-1858 -- The U.S. Army and the symbolic conquering of Mormon sovereignty -- To 1862 : the codification of federal authority and the end of popular sovereignty in the western territories.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

During the summer of 1857, President James Buchanan sent 2,500 US Army soldiers to the Utah Territory to establish unambiguous federal authority throughout the Great Basin region. In addition to the soldiers' deployment, a new governor was assigned to the territory, as were other executive and judicial officials. It was intended that henceforth, local laws previously established through Mormon authority would be subject to veto by these federal representatives. Brigham Young and other leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints resisted the advance of these troops in what became known as the Mormon War. In this tumultuous era, when Americans were growing more divided over the issues of sectionalism and slavery expansion, the issue of States' Rights guided much of the national debate. Although a majority of southern whites supported the principles of limiting federal power and strengthening state sovereignty, they supported this military operation to corral a perceived sense of Mormon independence. This excellent interpretation of the causes and results of the Mormon War is presented within the larger context of national events, which, in turn, led to the American Civil War. For all adult readers and researchers. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Michael L. Tate, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Brent M. Rogers is a historian and documentary editor for the Joseph Smith Papers . He is also an instructor of history and religious education at Brigham Young University, Salt Lake Center.

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