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At the first table : food and social identity in early modern Spain / Jodi Campbell.

By: Campbell, Jodi, 1968- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Early modern cultural studies.Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2017Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803296596; 0803296592; 9780803296619; 0803296614.Subject(s): Food -- Symbolic aspects -- SpainAdditional physical formats: Print version:: At the first tableDDC classification: 394.1/2094609031 Other classification: HIS045000 | SOC026000 | CKB041000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "Research on European food culture has expanded substantially in recent years, telling us more about food preparation, ingredients, feasting and fasting rituals, and the social and cultural connotations of food. At the First Table demonstrates the ways in which early modern Spaniards used food as a mechanism for the performance of social identity. People perceived themselves and others as belonging to clearly defined categories of gender, status, age, occupation, and religion, and each of these categories carried certain assumptions about proper behavior and appropriate relationships with others. Food choices and dining customs were effective and visible ways of displaying these behaviors in the choreography of everyday life. In contexts from funerals to festivals to their treatment of the poor, Spaniards used food to display their wealth, social connections, religious affiliation, regional heritage, and membership in various groups and institutions and to reinforce perceptions of difference. Research on European food culture has been based largely on studies of England, France, and Italy, but more locally on Spain. Jodi Campbell combines these studies with original research in household accounts, university and monastic records, and municipal regulations to provide a broad overview of Spanish food customs and to demonstrate their connections to identity and social change in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "At the First Table demonstrates the ways in which early modern Spaniards used food as a mechanism for the performance and maintenance of social identity"-- Provided by publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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GT2853.S7 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1hhfnq1 Available ocn953738714

"Research on European food culture has expanded substantially in recent years, telling us more about food preparation, ingredients, feasting and fasting rituals, and the social and cultural connotations of food. At the First Table demonstrates the ways in which early modern Spaniards used food as a mechanism for the performance of social identity. People perceived themselves and others as belonging to clearly defined categories of gender, status, age, occupation, and religion, and each of these categories carried certain assumptions about proper behavior and appropriate relationships with others. Food choices and dining customs were effective and visible ways of displaying these behaviors in the choreography of everyday life. In contexts from funerals to festivals to their treatment of the poor, Spaniards used food to display their wealth, social connections, religious affiliation, regional heritage, and membership in various groups and institutions and to reinforce perceptions of difference. Research on European food culture has been based largely on studies of England, France, and Italy, but more locally on Spain. Jodi Campbell combines these studies with original research in household accounts, university and monastic records, and municipal regulations to provide a broad overview of Spanish food customs and to demonstrate their connections to identity and social change in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries"-- Provided by publisher.

"At the First Table demonstrates the ways in which early modern Spaniards used food as a mechanism for the performance and maintenance of social identity"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Texas Christian historian Campbell's latest book examines the social role that food and its acquisition, preparation, and consumption played in Spain from the late medieval through early modern periods. The book is a worthy addition to the expanding volume of material being written these days on the history of food. The author divides her work into four chapters: food practices and beliefs; food as social and religious markers; diet as a signifier of social status and display; and changes in the 17th and 18th centuries as extravagance gave way to other forms of display, such as table manners as status markers. In a hierarchical society like Spain in this period, food and its presentation were always part of the theatre by which those of high station asserted their position, but social and economic upheavals were reflected in changes in diet and eating habits as Spain went into decline and ideas about social rank, charity, and conspicuous consumption evolved. This excellent work of scholarship, the fruit of much research in the National Historical Archive of Spain and the Biblioteca Nacional, should be acquired by university libraries, particularly those with strong history collections. Extensive bibliography and copious footnotes. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Douglas C. Kierdorf, Westfield State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jodi Campbell is an associate professor of European history at Texas Christian University. She is the author of Monarchy, Political Culture, and Drama in Seventeenth-Century Madrid: Theater of Negotiation and coeditor of Women in Port: Gendering Communities, Economies, and Social Networks in Atlantic Port Cities, 1500-1800 .<br>

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