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How the gloves came off : lawyers, policy makers, and norms in the debate on torture / Elizabeth Grimm Arsenault.

By: Arsenault, Elizabeth Grimm [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Columbia studies in terrorism and irregular warfare: Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2017]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231543255; 0231543255.Subject(s): Torture -- Government policy -- United States | Prisoners of war -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: How the gloves came offDDC classification: 364.6/7 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- History of POW treatment in the United States: from the Revolutionary War to the Korean War -- Modern POW treatment in the United States: the Vietnam War, the Geneva Conventions, and the pre-9/11 era -- POW treatment and lawyers -- POW treatment and policy makers -- POW treatment and interrogators -- Implications and recommendations.
Summary: "The treatment of detainees at Abu Ghraib prison, Guantánamo Bay, and far-flung CIA 'black sites' after the attacks of 9/11 included cruelty that defied legal and normative prohibitions in U.S. and international law. The antitorture stance of the United States was brushed aside. Since then, the guarantee of American civil liberties and due process for POWs and detainees has grown muddled, threatening the norms that sustain modern democracies. 'How the Gloves Came Off' considers the legal and political arguments that led to this standoff between civility and chaos and their significant consequences for the strategic interests and standing of the United States. Unpacking the rhetoric surrounding the push for unitary executive action in wartime, 'How the Gloves Came Off' traces the unmaking of the consensus against torture. It implicates U.S. military commanders, high-level government administrators, lawyers, and policy makers from both parties, exposing the ease with which powerful actors manipulated ambiguities to strip detainees of their humanity. By targeting the language and logic that made torture thinkable, this book shows how future decision makers can craft an effective counternarrative and set a new course for U.S. policy toward POWs and detainees. Whether leaders use their influence to reinforce a prohibition of cruelty to prisoners or continue to undermine long-standing international law will determine whether the United States retains a core component of its founding identity."--JSTOR website (viewed February 24, 2017).
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV8599.U6 A77 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/arse18078 Available ocn954038592

"The treatment of detainees at Abu Ghraib prison, Guantánamo Bay, and far-flung CIA 'black sites' after the attacks of 9/11 included cruelty that defied legal and normative prohibitions in U.S. and international law. The antitorture stance of the United States was brushed aside. Since then, the guarantee of American civil liberties and due process for POWs and detainees has grown muddled, threatening the norms that sustain modern democracies. 'How the Gloves Came Off' considers the legal and political arguments that led to this standoff between civility and chaos and their significant consequences for the strategic interests and standing of the United States. Unpacking the rhetoric surrounding the push for unitary executive action in wartime, 'How the Gloves Came Off' traces the unmaking of the consensus against torture. It implicates U.S. military commanders, high-level government administrators, lawyers, and policy makers from both parties, exposing the ease with which powerful actors manipulated ambiguities to strip detainees of their humanity. By targeting the language and logic that made torture thinkable, this book shows how future decision makers can craft an effective counternarrative and set a new course for U.S. policy toward POWs and detainees. Whether leaders use their influence to reinforce a prohibition of cruelty to prisoners or continue to undermine long-standing international law will determine whether the United States retains a core component of its founding identity."--JSTOR website (viewed February 24, 2017).

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- History of POW treatment in the United States: from the Revolutionary War to the Korean War -- Modern POW treatment in the United States: the Vietnam War, the Geneva Conventions, and the pre-9/11 era -- POW treatment and lawyers -- POW treatment and policy makers -- POW treatment and interrogators -- Implications and recommendations.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on February 28, 2017).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Post 9/11, the US government abandoned its long standing policy of not using torture. There are many works that chronicle the why and when of this policy shift. Arsenault (Georgetown) fills a void in the literature by analyzing and explaining how the embedded norms against the use of torture changed after al Qaeda's attacks on the United States. Arsenault successfully argues that the use of enhanced interrogation methods was not the work of "a few bad apples." The respect for international law and US norms of conduct unraveled when policy makers vowed that another 9/11 would not happen on US soil. Following the lead of the policy makers, lawyers in the executive branch justified the use of torture to gain actionable information from captured, suspected terrorists. It was not the interrogators in the field who altered the norms. They acted on the instructions of the policy makers and lawyers. The author contends that in the end the enhanced interrogation policy proved to be more costly than beneficial to US interests. This is a well-written, superbly researched work that should find its way onto the bookshelves of every person interested in how the US government journeyed into the abyss of torture during the global war on terrorism. Summing Up: Essential. General readers; upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --James Richard Hedtke, Cabrini College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elizabeth Grimm Arsenault is a visiting assistant professor in the Security Studies Program at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She has worked in the defense and security sectors of the U.S. government and is the recipient of Georgetown's Dorothy Brown Award for excellence in teaching and the School of Foreign Service Faculty of the Year Award.

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