Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Carlisle Indian Industrial School : indigenous histories, memories, and reclamations / edited by Jacqueline Fear-Segal and Susan D. Rose.

Contributor(s): Rose, Susan D, 1955- [editor.] | Fear-Segal, Jacqueline [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Indigenous education: Publisher: Lincoln, NB : University of Nebraska Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803295070; 0803295073; 9780803295094; 080329509X.Subject(s): Racism in education -- Pennsylvania -- Carlisle -- History | Collective memory -- United States | Indians, Treatment of -- United States -- History | Indian students -- Relocation -- United States -- History | Indians of North America -- Pennsylvania -- Carlisle -- Ethnic identity -- History | Indians of North America -- Cultural assimilation -- Pennsylvania -- Carlisle -- History | Indians of North America -- Education -- Pennsylvania -- Carlisle -- History | Indians of North America -- Cultural assimilation -- United States | Off-reservation boarding schools -- Pennsylvania -- Carlisle -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Carlisle Indian Industrial School.DDC classification: 371.829/97074843 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Welcome, with Seneca Thanksgiving Prayer "We Are One" by Peter Jemison (Seneca); Part 1. A Sacred and Storied Place; 1. The Stones at Carlisle; 2. Before Carlisle: The Lower Susquehanna Valley as Contested Native Space; Part 2. Student Lives and Losses; 3. Photograph: Carlisle Poem-Who Is This Boy?; 4. The Names; 5. White Power and the Performance of Assimilation: Lincoln Institute and Carlisle Indian School; 6. The Imperial Gridiron: Dealing with the Legacy of Carlisle Indian School Sports.
7. WastePart 3. Carlisle Indian School Cemetery; 8. Cementerio indio; 9. The History and Reclamation of a Sacred Space: The Indian School Cemetery; 10. Death at Carlisle: Naming the Unknownsin the Cemetery; Part 4. Reclamations; 11. The Lost Ones: Piecing Together the Story; 12. Necropolitics, Carlisle Indian School, and Ndé Memory; 13. Sacred Journey: Restoring My Plains Indian Tipi; 14. Carlisle Farmhouse: A Major Site of Memory; Part 5. Revisioning the Past; 15. Research Note on the Carlisle Indian Industrial School Digital Humanities Project.
16. Carlisle Indian Industrial School: Projects for TeachingPart 6. Reflections and Responses; 17. The Spirit Survives; 18. Response to Visiting Carlisle: Experiencing Intergenerational Trauma; 19. The Presence of Ghosts; 20. A Sacred Space; 21. Carlisle: My Hometown; 22. The Ndé and Carlisle: Reflections on the Symposium; Epilogue; Chronology; Selected Bibliography; Published Resources for Researching the Carlisle Indian Industrial School; Contributors; Index.
Subject: "This collection interweaves the voices of students' descendants, poets, and activists with cutting edge research by Native and non-Native scholars to reveal the complex history and enduring legacies of the school that spearheaded the federal campaign for Indian assimilation."--Provided by publisher.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E97.6.C2 C365 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1dwssxz Available ocn956626800

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"This collection interweaves the voices of students' descendants, poets, and activists with cutting edge research by Native and non-Native scholars to reveal the complex history and enduring legacies of the school that spearheaded the federal campaign for Indian assimilation."--Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Welcome, with Seneca Thanksgiving Prayer "We Are One" by Peter Jemison (Seneca); Part 1. A Sacred and Storied Place; 1. The Stones at Carlisle; 2. Before Carlisle: The Lower Susquehanna Valley as Contested Native Space; Part 2. Student Lives and Losses; 3. Photograph: Carlisle Poem-Who Is This Boy?; 4. The Names; 5. White Power and the Performance of Assimilation: Lincoln Institute and Carlisle Indian School; 6. The Imperial Gridiron: Dealing with the Legacy of Carlisle Indian School Sports.

7. WastePart 3. Carlisle Indian School Cemetery; 8. Cementerio indio; 9. The History and Reclamation of a Sacred Space: The Indian School Cemetery; 10. Death at Carlisle: Naming the Unknownsin the Cemetery; Part 4. Reclamations; 11. The Lost Ones: Piecing Together the Story; 12. Necropolitics, Carlisle Indian School, and Ndé Memory; 13. Sacred Journey: Restoring My Plains Indian Tipi; 14. Carlisle Farmhouse: A Major Site of Memory; Part 5. Revisioning the Past; 15. Research Note on the Carlisle Indian Industrial School Digital Humanities Project.

16. Carlisle Indian Industrial School: Projects for TeachingPart 6. Reflections and Responses; 17. The Spirit Survives; 18. Response to Visiting Carlisle: Experiencing Intergenerational Trauma; 19. The Presence of Ghosts; 20. A Sacred Space; 21. Carlisle: My Hometown; 22. The Ndé and Carlisle: Reflections on the Symposium; Epilogue; Chronology; Selected Bibliography; Published Resources for Researching the Carlisle Indian Industrial School; Contributors; Index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Fear-Segal (Univ. of East Anglia, UK) and Rose (Dickinson College) have put together 22 essays based on a 2012 symposium held in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on the history of the US government-run Carlisle Indian Industrial School, which sought to assimilate American Indians into "white" American culture from 1879 to its closure in 1918. The symposium brought together descendants of Carlisle students, historians, and others to remember the over ten thousand American Indian children who attended the school, sometimes forcefully brought as prisoners of war, and to memorialize those who died there as well as the many who survived. The school's founder, army officer Richard H. Pratt, sought to "kill the Indian to save the man"; in other words, to inflict cultural genocide so that American Indians would fade into the general population, including intermarrying with "white" Americans. The book's essays start with the Indian history of the Carlisle area and the impact of colonialism, and end with current efforts to keep Carlisle's history alive by preserving remnants of the school. Pulitzer Prize-winning Kiowa author N. Scott Momaday provides the first chapter and an epilogue. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Jon Allan Reyhner, Northern Arizona University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jacqueline Fear-Segal is a professor of American and Indigenous histories at the University of East Anglia, UK. She is the author of White Man's Club: Schools, Race, and the Struggle of Indian Acculturation (Nebraska, 2007) and coeditor of Indigenous Bodies: Reviewing, Relocating, Reclaiming . Susan D. Rose is the Charles A. Dana Professor of Sociology at Dickinson College. She is the author of Keeping Them Out of the Hands of Satan: Evangelical Schooling in America and Challenging Global Gender Violence and coauthor of Exporting the American Gospel: Global Christian Fundamentalism .

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.