Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Booker T. Washington in American memory / Kenneth M. Hamilton.

By: Hamilton, Kenneth Marvin, 1947- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; The new Black studies series.Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2017]Edition: Second edition.Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252099229; 0252099222.Subject(s): Eulogies -- United States | Collective memory -- United States | Protestant work ethic | Civil rights movements -- United States -- History | African Americans -- Intellectual lifeAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Booker T. Washington in American memoryDDC classification: 370.92 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
"A great man fallen": the immediate death notices -- A symbol of America : obituaries and other published memorials -- "Taps" : the funeral in Tuskegee -- "A debt of gratitude" : tributes across the nation -- "Sermon tonight on Booker T. Washington" : months of commemorations and eulogies -- Gone but not forgotten : eulogies and the sanctification of Washington -- Epilogue.
Summary: "This project examines the response to Booker T. Washington's death, analyzing the many ways in which both black and white Americans involved in the Yankee Protestant Ethic Movement honored or memorialized the great visionary. The northern-based Movement originally saw southerners as a people who embraced a profane ethic, one that undermined the glory of the nation. In order to shift southerners away from their lazy, inefficient, and uneducated ways, the Movement engaged them in a culture war that employed multiple educational and evangelical agencies. When white southerners resisted such interference, the Movement began concentrating more exclusively on black southerners. Washington became an advocate for the Movement, and in turn the Movement became a cornerstone of Washington's ideology. After Washington's death, leading supporters of the Movement wanted to perpetuate his vision. They used obituaries, burial rites, memorials, and eulogies as weapons of choice in their efforts to continue a culture war between a supposedly democratic North and a seemingly aristocratic South. Hamilton reexamines Washington's influences, thereby producing a new understanding of his life. Integrating an analysis of letters of solace, obituaries, and other archival documents, Hamilton examines the ways that the memory of Washington and his works were cultivated and utilized by his contemporaries to promote racial consciousness. By closely working with the documents that reflect the memory and admiration of Washington at the time of his death, Hamilton is also able to show how recollections of Washington have shifted or become obscured by more recent historical assumptions or interpretations."--Provided by publisher.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.97.W4 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt1m3218v Available ocn959667277

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"A great man fallen": the immediate death notices -- A symbol of America : obituaries and other published memorials -- "Taps" : the funeral in Tuskegee -- "A debt of gratitude" : tributes across the nation -- "Sermon tonight on Booker T. Washington" : months of commemorations and eulogies -- Gone but not forgotten : eulogies and the sanctification of Washington -- Epilogue.

"This project examines the response to Booker T. Washington's death, analyzing the many ways in which both black and white Americans involved in the Yankee Protestant Ethic Movement honored or memorialized the great visionary. The northern-based Movement originally saw southerners as a people who embraced a profane ethic, one that undermined the glory of the nation. In order to shift southerners away from their lazy, inefficient, and uneducated ways, the Movement engaged them in a culture war that employed multiple educational and evangelical agencies. When white southerners resisted such interference, the Movement began concentrating more exclusively on black southerners. Washington became an advocate for the Movement, and in turn the Movement became a cornerstone of Washington's ideology. After Washington's death, leading supporters of the Movement wanted to perpetuate his vision. They used obituaries, burial rites, memorials, and eulogies as weapons of choice in their efforts to continue a culture war between a supposedly democratic North and a seemingly aristocratic South. Hamilton reexamines Washington's influences, thereby producing a new understanding of his life. Integrating an analysis of letters of solace, obituaries, and other archival documents, Hamilton examines the ways that the memory of Washington and his works were cultivated and utilized by his contemporaries to promote racial consciousness. By closely working with the documents that reflect the memory and admiration of Washington at the time of his death, Hamilton is also able to show how recollections of Washington have shifted or become obscured by more recent historical assumptions or interpretations."--Provided by publisher.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.