Normal view MARC view ISBD view

A cultural history of underdevelopment : Latin America in the U.S. imagination / John Patrick Leary.

By: Leary, John Patrick, 1979- [author.].
Contributor(s): Project Muse.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; New world studies.Publisher: Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (pages cm.).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813939155; 0813939151; 9780813939179; 0813939178.Subject(s): Public opinion -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: No titleDDC classification: 327.7308 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Latin America and the meanings of "underdevelopment" in the United States -- Latin America as anachronism: the Cuban campaign for annexation and a future safe for slavery, 1848-1856 -- Latin America as nature: U.S. travel writing and the invention of tropical underdevelopment -- Latin America at war: the yellow press from Mulberry Street to Cuba -- Latin America and Bohemia: Latinophilia and the revitalization of U.S. culture -- Latin America, in solidarity: Havana reads the Harlem Renaissance -- Latin America in revolution: the politics and erotics of Latin American revolutions -- Coda: the places of the "third world" in contemporary U.S culture.
Summary: "A Cultural History of Underdevelopment explores the changing place of Latin America in U.S. culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the recent U.S.-Cuba détente. In doing so, it uncovers the complex ways in which Americans have imagined the global geography of poverty and progress, as the hemispheric imperialism of the nineteenth century yielded to the Cold War discourse of "underdevelopment." John Patrick Leary examines representations of uneven development in Latin America across a variety of genres and media, from canonical fiction and poetry to cinema, photography, journalism, popular song, travel narratives, and development theory. For the United States, Latin America has figured variously as good neighbor and insurgent threat, as its possible future and a remnant of its past. By illuminating the conventional ways in which Americans have imagined their place in the hemisphere, the author shows how the popular image of the United States as a modern, exceptional nation has been produced by a century of encounters that travelers, writers, radicals, filmmakers, and others have had with Latin America. Drawing on authors such as James Weldon Johnson, Willa Cather, and Ernest Hemingway, Leary argues that Latin America has figured in U.S. culture not just as an exotic "other" but as the familiar reflection of the United States' own regional, racial, class, and political inequalities." -- Publisher's description.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F1418 .L43 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1g69vzn Available ocn959830896

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Latin America and the meanings of "underdevelopment" in the United States -- Latin America as anachronism: the Cuban campaign for annexation and a future safe for slavery, 1848-1856 -- Latin America as nature: U.S. travel writing and the invention of tropical underdevelopment -- Latin America at war: the yellow press from Mulberry Street to Cuba -- Latin America and Bohemia: Latinophilia and the revitalization of U.S. culture -- Latin America, in solidarity: Havana reads the Harlem Renaissance -- Latin America in revolution: the politics and erotics of Latin American revolutions -- Coda: the places of the "third world" in contemporary U.S culture.

Description based on print version record.

"A Cultural History of Underdevelopment explores the changing place of Latin America in U.S. culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the recent U.S.-Cuba détente. In doing so, it uncovers the complex ways in which Americans have imagined the global geography of poverty and progress, as the hemispheric imperialism of the nineteenth century yielded to the Cold War discourse of "underdevelopment." John Patrick Leary examines representations of uneven development in Latin America across a variety of genres and media, from canonical fiction and poetry to cinema, photography, journalism, popular song, travel narratives, and development theory. For the United States, Latin America has figured variously as good neighbor and insurgent threat, as its possible future and a remnant of its past. By illuminating the conventional ways in which Americans have imagined their place in the hemisphere, the author shows how the popular image of the United States as a modern, exceptional nation has been produced by a century of encounters that travelers, writers, radicals, filmmakers, and others have had with Latin America. Drawing on authors such as James Weldon Johnson, Willa Cather, and Ernest Hemingway, Leary argues that Latin America has figured in U.S. culture not just as an exotic "other" but as the familiar reflection of the United States' own regional, racial, class, and political inequalities." -- Publisher's description.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>John Patrick Leary is Assistant Professor of English at Wayne State University.</p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.