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Counterpreservation : architectural decay in Berlin since 1989 / Daniela Sandler.

By: Sandler, Daniela, 1974- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Signale (Ithaca, N.Y.): Publisher: Ithaca, New York : Cornell University Press : Cornell University Library, 2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781501706271; 1501706276.Subject(s): Architecture -- Germany -- Berlin -- History | Ruined buildings -- Germany -- Berlin | Ruins, Modern -- Germany -- BerlinAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Counterpreservation.DDC classification: 720.943/1550904 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Counterpreservation as a concept -- Living projects : collective housing, alternative culture, and spaces of resistance -- Cultural centers : history, architecture, and public space -- Decrepitude and memory in the landscape -- Counterpreservation in reverse -- Destruction and disappearance : East German ruins -- Conclusion : toward an architecture of change.
Summary: "In Berlin, decrepit structures do not always denote urban blight. Decayed buildings are incorporated into everyday life as residences, exhibition spaces, shops, offices, and as leisure space. As nodes of public dialogue, they serve as platforms for dissenting views about the future and past of Berlin. In this book, Daniela Sandler introduces the concept of counterpreservation as a way to understand this intentional appropriation of decrepitude. The embrace of decay is a sign of Berlin's iconoclastic rebelliousness, but it has also been incorporated into the mainstream economy of tourism and development as part of the city's countercultural cachet. Sandler presents the possibilities and shortcomings of counterpreservation as a dynamic force in Berlin and as a potential concept for other cities"-- Publisher's Web site.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
NA1085 .S26 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt1d2dnjg Available ocn965831611

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Counterpreservation as a concept -- Living projects : collective housing, alternative culture, and spaces of resistance -- Cultural centers : history, architecture, and public space -- Decrepitude and memory in the landscape -- Counterpreservation in reverse -- Destruction and disappearance : East German ruins -- Conclusion : toward an architecture of change.

"In Berlin, decrepit structures do not always denote urban blight. Decayed buildings are incorporated into everyday life as residences, exhibition spaces, shops, offices, and as leisure space. As nodes of public dialogue, they serve as platforms for dissenting views about the future and past of Berlin. In this book, Daniela Sandler introduces the concept of counterpreservation as a way to understand this intentional appropriation of decrepitude. The embrace of decay is a sign of Berlin's iconoclastic rebelliousness, but it has also been incorporated into the mainstream economy of tourism and development as part of the city's countercultural cachet. Sandler presents the possibilities and shortcomings of counterpreservation as a dynamic force in Berlin and as a potential concept for other cities"-- Publisher's Web site.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A scholar of architectural and urban history, Sandler (School of Architecture, Univ. of Minnesota) defines "counterpreservation" as "the intentional use of architectural decay" in "response to three issues that have defined [Berlin] since 1989: gentrification, historical memory, and unification." In chapter 1 she explores the concept of counterpreservation at length and in depth, and she devotes the remaining chapters to case studies of five sites (representing ten years of field research). Examined are a group of "living projects," i.e., alternative societies such as collective housing; "cultural centers," arts and culture, gentrified away; the Sachsenhausen Memorial, developed around an abandoned concentration camp; the Topography of Terror museum (the Nazi documentation center and gestapo headquarters in the heart of Berlin), a site where the idea of counterpreservation is reversed in favor of evocative modernist voids; and the Palace of the Republic, the site of the East German parliament, and its temporary uses. Sandler concludes with a brilliantly argued case for the worldwide significance of counterpreservation as a conceptual force that challenges the fundamental tenets of historic preservation as it is practiced in the West today. Unfortunately the quality of the images does not measure up to that of the text. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty, and professionals; general readers. --Jack Quinan, independent scholar

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Daniela Sandler is Assistant Professor of Architectural and Urban History in the School of Architecture of the University of Minnesota.</p>

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