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The animal rights struggle : an essay in historical sociology / Christophe Traïni.

By: Traïni, Christophe [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Protest and social movements: 6.Publisher: Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press, [2016]Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (206 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789048527038; 9048527031; 9089648496; 9789089648495.Uniform titles: Cause animale, 1820-1980. English Subject(s): Animal rights -- History | Animal welfare -- History | Human-animal relationships -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Animal rights struggle.DDC classification: 179.3 LOC classification: HV4705 | .T73 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
1. A long and complex struggle -- 2. Noble gentleness, vile cruelty -- 3. To act as an enlightened philosopher -- 4. To enlighten the ignorant, to refine the barbarian -- 5. "Us," the animals and "them" -- 6. The rise in the power of tenderness -- 7. (Animal) victims and social domination -- 8. A decreasingly "wild" nature.
Summary: From the beginning of the 19th century to the present day, a host of campaigners have denounced the mistreatment of animals. Relying on a comparison of the British and French experiences, this book retraces the various strands of the animal protection movement, from their origins to their continuing impact on current debates. The story of the collective mobilizations behind the struggle for animal rights sheds light on several crucial processes in our social and political history: changes in sensibilities and socially approved emotions; the definition of what constitutes legitimate violence; the establishment of norms designed to change what constitutes morally acceptable practices; rivalry between elites having differing conceptions of the forms authority should take; the influence of religious belief on militant activities; and the effects of gender discrimination.-- From publisher's description.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HV4705 .T73 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1jd94gh Available ocn966641373

Text translated by Richard Jemmett.

From the beginning of the 19th century to the present day, a host of campaigners have denounced the mistreatment of animals. Relying on a comparison of the British and French experiences, this book retraces the various strands of the animal protection movement, from their origins to their continuing impact on current debates. The story of the collective mobilizations behind the struggle for animal rights sheds light on several crucial processes in our social and political history: changes in sensibilities and socially approved emotions; the definition of what constitutes legitimate violence; the establishment of norms designed to change what constitutes morally acceptable practices; rivalry between elites having differing conceptions of the forms authority should take; the influence of religious belief on militant activities; and the effects of gender discrimination.-- From publisher's description.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. A long and complex struggle -- 2. Noble gentleness, vile cruelty -- 3. To act as an enlightened philosopher -- 4. To enlighten the ignorant, to refine the barbarian -- 5. "Us," the animals and "them" -- 6. The rise in the power of tenderness -- 7. (Animal) victims and social domination -- 8. A decreasingly "wild" nature.

Print version record.

Text translated from French.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This interesting book traces the emotional trajectory of the animal protection movement from its beginnings in 19th-century Britain and France to the present day. Contending that the movement has too often been reduced to "simplistic stereotypes," Traini (political science, Institute of Political Science in Aix-en-Provence, France) aims at a more nuanced portrait. He links the changing methodology of activists and activism to broader historical circumstances and the concerns that attended them. The earliest activists were less concerned with the suffering of animals than with the "brutishness" of the humans who abused them: upper-class conservatives aimed at controlling and modifying the behavior of those they saw as their inferiors. During the last third of the 19th century, an increasing number of reformers, prompted by a mounting spirit of egalitarianism, emphasized compassion for animals themselves--especially household pets--as central to the animal protection agenda. Finally, toward the end of the century, a number of activists turned to what they saw as "hidden acts of cruelty," launching protests against scientific experiments involving animals. The final chapter examines the varied character of the modern movement, its relation to environmental science, and its emphasis on the "wild." Well written and clearly argued (although contaminated by some confusing printing errors), this book should appeal to all audiences. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Naomi Braun Rosenthal, Stonybrook University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Christophe Traïni is professor of political science at the Institute of Political Science in Aix-en-Provence.<br>

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