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The American political pattern : stability and change, 1932-2016 / Byron E. Shafer.

By: Shafer, Byron E [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Studies in government and public policy: Publisher: Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, 2016. 2015)Description: 1 online resource : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700623280; 0700623280.Subject(s): Political culture -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 320.973 Other classification: POL040000 | POL015000 | POL007000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface: an American political pattern? -- Birth pangs of the modern world: the political structure of the high New Deal era, 1932-1938 -- The long arm of the New Deal: the political structure of the late New Deal era, 1939-1968 -- The rise of participatory politics: the political structure of an era of divided government, 1969-1992 -- A political structure for the modern world: the era of partisan volatility, 1993-2016 -- Conclusion: stability and change in American politics, 1932-2016.
Summary: "We live in a time of hyper political polarization that makes governing extremely difficult. How did we get here? In this book Byron Shafer explores American politics from 1932 to the present to understand the underlying patterns of American politics and how changes in these patterns have affected policymaking. He divides American politics since 1932 into four periods. He argues that American politics during this time can be examined by looking at changes in the balance between the political parties; ideological polarization (or the distance on policy issues between contending forces); and substantive conflict over policy. These are set in the context of external demands for government action (i.e. depression, war, civil rights) as well as the institutions of American government (separation of powers and federalism) that structure how groups compete over government policy"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "Politicians are polarized. Public opinion is volatile. Government is gridlocked. Or so journalists and pundits constantly report. But where are we, really, in modern American politics, and how did we get there? Those are the questions that Byron E. Shafer aims to answer in The American Political Pattern. Looking at the state of American politics at diverse points over the past eighty years, the book draws a picture, broad in scope yet precise in detail, of our political system in the modern era. It is a picture of stretches of political stability, but also, even more, of political change, one that goes a long way toward explaining how shifting factors alter the content of public policy and the character of American politicking. Shafer divides the modern world into four distinct periods: the High New Deal (1932-1938), the Late New Deal (1939-1968), the Era of Divided Government (1969-1992), and the Era of Partisan Volatility (1993-2016). Each period is characterized by a different arrangement of the same key factors: party balance, ideological polarization, issue conflict, and the policy-making process that goes with them. The American Political Pattern shows how these factors are in turn shaped by permanent aspects of the US Constitution, most especially the separation of powers and federalism, while their alignment is simultaneously influenced by the external demands for governmental action that arise in each period, including those derived from economic currents, major wars, and social movements. Analyzing these periods, Shafer sets the terms for understanding the structure and dynamics of politics in our own turbulent time. Placing the current political world in its historical and evolutionary framework, while illuminating major influences on American politics over time, his book explains where this modern world came from, why it endures, and how it might change yet again. "-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JK271 .S4429 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1k235h2 Available ocn966768988

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"We live in a time of hyper political polarization that makes governing extremely difficult. How did we get here? In this book Byron Shafer explores American politics from 1932 to the present to understand the underlying patterns of American politics and how changes in these patterns have affected policymaking. He divides American politics since 1932 into four periods. He argues that American politics during this time can be examined by looking at changes in the balance between the political parties; ideological polarization (or the distance on policy issues between contending forces); and substantive conflict over policy. These are set in the context of external demands for government action (i.e. depression, war, civil rights) as well as the institutions of American government (separation of powers and federalism) that structure how groups compete over government policy"-- Provided by publisher.

"Politicians are polarized. Public opinion is volatile. Government is gridlocked. Or so journalists and pundits constantly report. But where are we, really, in modern American politics, and how did we get there? Those are the questions that Byron E. Shafer aims to answer in The American Political Pattern. Looking at the state of American politics at diverse points over the past eighty years, the book draws a picture, broad in scope yet precise in detail, of our political system in the modern era. It is a picture of stretches of political stability, but also, even more, of political change, one that goes a long way toward explaining how shifting factors alter the content of public policy and the character of American politicking. Shafer divides the modern world into four distinct periods: the High New Deal (1932-1938), the Late New Deal (1939-1968), the Era of Divided Government (1969-1992), and the Era of Partisan Volatility (1993-2016). Each period is characterized by a different arrangement of the same key factors: party balance, ideological polarization, issue conflict, and the policy-making process that goes with them. The American Political Pattern shows how these factors are in turn shaped by permanent aspects of the US Constitution, most especially the separation of powers and federalism, while their alignment is simultaneously influenced by the external demands for governmental action that arise in each period, including those derived from economic currents, major wars, and social movements. Analyzing these periods, Shafer sets the terms for understanding the structure and dynamics of politics in our own turbulent time. Placing the current political world in its historical and evolutionary framework, while illuminating major influences on American politics over time, his book explains where this modern world came from, why it endures, and how it might change yet again. "-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on March 21, 2017).

Preface: an American political pattern? -- Birth pangs of the modern world: the political structure of the high New Deal era, 1932-1938 -- The long arm of the New Deal: the political structure of the late New Deal era, 1939-1968 -- The rise of participatory politics: the political structure of an era of divided government, 1969-1992 -- A political structure for the modern world: the era of partisan volatility, 1993-2016 -- Conclusion: stability and change in American politics, 1932-2016.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this book, Shafer (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison) attempts to make big-picture sense of American politics since the New Deal. Having grown "increasingly frustrated" with the inability of students, journalists, and even colleagues to place and/or explain current political happenings in any kind of larger context, Shafer is "compelled ... to try to tell you where the modern world came from, what causes it to hang around, and, by extension, what might cause it to go." His method of achieving these goals involves the creation of an organizing framework of American politics comprising party balance, ideological polarization, and substantive conflict. The desired endgame of this framework is a clear understanding of the way public policy is made during the four distinct political eras Shafer argues exist during the period covered by his analysis: The High New Deal Era (1932-38), The Late New Deal Era (1939-68), The Era of Divided Government (1969-93), and The Era of Partisan Volatility (1993-2016). Shafer makes a compelling case for his organizing structure. There is little in terms of original research here, but that is not the purpose of this volume. Shafer aims to provide a means to understand the whole of American politics since the New Deal, and in this he succeeds. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Mark D. Brewer, University of Maine

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